palaeography

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palaeography

1. the study of the handwritings of the past, and often the manuscripts as well, so that they may be dated, read, etc., and may serve as historical and literary sources
2. a handwriting of the past
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
See also the conveniently collected paleographic studies of <[phrase omitted]> in Guwenzi gulin bianzuan weiyudnhui (Shanghai: Shanghai jiaoyu chubanshe, 1999).
Given that some of Salviati's manuscripts have not been credited to him, despite receiving ample attention, we may also shed light on manuscripts that have heretofore been credited to him erroneously, because they may not have had a paleographic analysis.
A few undated ones (e.g., No 1) are dated on paleographic basis.
Juan Pedro Monferrer-Sala, "Once Again on the Earliest Christian Arabic Apology: Remarks on a Paleographic Singularity" [195-197]
Bagnall displays his holistic approach at the outset; he's written this book, he says, because of his "unease with what I see as the excessively self-enclosed character and absence of self-awareness of much" paleographic scholarship.
This is undoubtedly the most important part of the book, because it enables us to better appreciate the paleographic, linguistic and literary features of each separate textual witness.
To that end, Matthias Rauert, an independent scholar working in Germany and Hungary, guides readers through a detailed linguistic and paleographic analysis of several late-sixteenth-century Hutterite manuscripts.
The era of Kaniska, now dated by Falk with a high degree of likelihood to AD 127/8 (Falk 2001, 2004), is too late on paleographic and linguistic grounds, and is anyway excluded because the year number exceeds 100.
In addition, when only one manuscript copy of a chronicle text exists or when a "best representative" copy exists, then the editor has the choice of simulating the morphologic and paleographic features of that copy, including abbreviated forms, superscripts, titlos, accents, punctuation marks, specialized characters, ligatures, and so forth (note that even in this attempt at manuscript verisimilitude, the editor is expected to make choices of word division).
The transcribed text reflects the paleographic markings of the time, and can be of great use to scholars who study the history of the Spanish language.