paleopole

paleopole

[′pāl·ē·ə‚pōl]
(geology)
A pole of the earth, either magnetic or geographic, in past geologic time.
References in periodicals archive ?
Magnetic polarity stratigraphy and Carboniferous paleopole positions from the Joggins section, Cumberland structural basin, Nova Scotia.
Young rocks-just a few million years old, you understand-point to a paleopole that's the same as today's.
Her name was Linda Noson, and she, along with her advisor, Myrl Beck, had just published a highly discordant paleopole from the Cretaceous Mt.
Randy Enkin, in his fine synoptic paper, offers the best and most careful analysis yet of all existing Cretaceous paleopoles. He emphasises the most reliable of them, especially those from bedded rocks, and shows that overall the Cordilleran poles cluster well at about 15[degrees] paleolatitude south of poles from contemporary North America, implying 2100 [+ or -] 700 kilometres of northward translation compared to the Eocene set, which are concordant.
(2002) have shown the power of every new precisely dated mafic event and associated paleopole in testing the putative Laurentia-Australia connection in the mid-Proteozoic, whereas Buchan et al.