paleotopography

paleotopography

[¦pāl·ē·ō·tə′päg·rə·fē]
(geology)
The topography of a given area in the geologic past.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
and Wildberger, A.: 2007, Cave and karst evolution in the Alps and their relation to paleoclimate and paleotopography. Acta Carsologica, 36, 53-68.
(2013), paleotopography was sufficient to deflect paleoflow to the southeast so that it paralleled the crest of the salt wall before eventually turning north.
Poage, "Reconstructing the paleotopography of mountain belts from the isotopic composition of authigenic minerals," Geology, vol.
The topics include field methods, paleotopography and stratigraphy, ground stone artifacts, bone and antler tools, mammals, birds, shellfish, and fish.
Work on the paleotopography of the sands below the ash indicates that Ashfall represents a seasonally water-filled deflation basin (Herbel, 1994).
The lowest member--the Tanner Member--fills in recognizable paleotopography cut into the underlying Nankoweap Formation.
The lateral variation in oil shale seam can be attributed to differential paleotopography. Palaeo-topographic low areas have more accommodation space than less compressible areas, so are subjected to more oil shale deposition.
On a broader scale our research implies: 1) reinterpretation of Late Silurian paleotopography between the Michigan and Illinois basins, indicating partial exposure of the Wabash Platform during deposition of the Kokomo Limestone and before deposition of the Kenneth Limestone; and 2) the rejection of the subtidal syneresis hypothesis of crack formation in these carbonate sediments.
Thickness is variable, ranging from approximately 120 to 200 m or more; it decreases rapidly along the western shore of Lake Como, where the unit is reduced to discontinuous lenses west of Acquaseria (Sciunnach et al., 1996), and changes abruptly in the Trento region across the Giudicarie Line, probably due to previous Permian paleotopography, increasing towards the east in the Dolomitic Alps.
The thickness of this unit varies accordingly to the paleotopography; the maximum measured thickness was 150 m but it must be thicker because we could not observe the base of the unit in several places.
Current or paleotopography and evolution of P-T conditions through time describe vertical crustal movements during orogenesis as well as the movement of heat through the crust.
We suggest that the Sharon Formation shows a consistent stratigraphic trend: coarsening upward through the interval in which these fluvial systems were confined to paleovalleys, and then finer-grained through the interval in which these fluvial systems had filled and overtopped paleotopography. Basin Evolution