Palinode


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Palinode

 

(also Kniga oborony; in English, Book of the Defense), a tract against the Brest Union of 1596. It was written by the Ukrainian writer Zakharii Kopystenskii in 1621–22 in Kiev. Kopystenskii sharply criticized the predatory policies of Poland and the Vatican in the Ukraine and Byelorussia and emphasized the historical ties between the Russian, Ukrainian, and Byelorussian peoples.

REFERENCE

“Pamiatniki polemicheskoi literatury v Zapadnoi Rusi.” In the collection Russkaia istoricheskaia biblioteka, vol. 4, book 1. St. Petersburg, 1878.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sceve's admirable dizain irresistibly evokes the palinode of a Chant royal reproduced by Gros, 1996, 319-21, from BNF ms.
The link to palinode is tenuous (though Berrahou does discuss fictionalized accounts of Sidney's own deathbed recantation) but the treatment of Sidney's use of imagery concerning children and motherhood is interesting, as is that of the possible political implications of the collection and its affinity to some of the ideas expressed by Castiglione in the Courtier.
When Socrates begins his palinode, he is very much aware that he is not making an argument whose truth will compel assent; instead, he cautions that his speech will not work with all audiences.
1, is the so-called palinode that Filelfo wrote to Cosimo, probably in about 1444.
In fact, a closer analysis of Lope's use of the term vulgo in his famous palinode uncovers an eminent rhetorical smartness, conspicuously transforming the pejorative term vulgo into the semantically and sociologically neutral publico, and eventually into the positive notion of the pueblo, simultaneously vindicating his own popular art yet capturing the benevolence of the classicist academics to whom he addresses his speech.
There is a palinode in Munich as well, turning on the trope of "home,"
This uncertainty is exemplified in Stesichorus's palinode and in the story of Helen's eidolon as developed by Euripides' Helen (13-15).
A palinode is a recantation or retraction of a previous position, and in Prosser's terms it becomes a ritual of impossible contrition.
It may be the palinode is reflected in Josephus' account of Gaius in War 2, and Antiquities 18-19.
But then the palinode of the last line, which, as so often in Millay, surprises through its down-to-earth--almost throwaway--quality that sneaks up on the reader: "And lust is there" perhaps less than admirable, but also "nights not spent alone," a small victory over loneliness.
Yet, through his palinode, the Hellenic longing for the beautiful is also respiritualized and repoliticized.
Thus God, Locke, and Equality represents a palinode.