pallasite


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pallasite

(pal -ă-sÿt) See stony-iron meteorite.

Pallasite

 

a rare stony-iron meteorite, named after the first extant meteorite of this type, Pallas iron, discovered in Siberia by the schoolteacher Medvedev and brought to St. Petersburg on the instructions of P. S. Pallas in 1772. Pallasites are composed of approximately equal quantities of nickel iron and olivine. The unique pallasite structure indicates that these meteorites were formed during the absence of gravitational force, or at least of significant gravitational force.

pallasite

[′pal·ə‚sīt]
(geology)
A stony-iron meteorite composed essentially of large single glassy crystals of olivine embedded in a network of nickel-iron.
An ultramafic rock, of either meteoric or terrestrial origin, which contains more than 60% iron in the former, or more iron oxides than silica in the latter.
References in periodicals archive ?
How could a scientist of his presumed caliber discover an exotic 10-ton pallasite and not record it in his journal?
Ilimaes is another pallasite found in the Atacama Desert about 50 years after Imilac and 170 miles farther south.
His current darling is the 571-kilogram Esquel pallasite, the largest of its kind in the world.
Sometimes irons are laced with silicate minerals, resulting in attractive (and valuable) specimens called mesosiderites or pallasites.
The most unusual peridot comes from meteorites (space rocks that hit Earth) called pallasites.
Norton begins with chondrites, the primitive stones that have survived from the earliest times in solar-system history, and methodically works his way to exotic types like pallasites (samples from the core-mantle boundaries of asteroids that have been smashed apart) and meteorites from the Moon and Mars.
For one, it is the granddaddy of the meteorite class now dubbed pallasites.