palliative

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Related to palliation: habiliments

palliative

[′pal·ē·əd·iv]
(pharmacology)
Having a soothing or relieving quality.
A drug that soothes or relieves symptoms of a disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Endoscopic clearance of common bile duct stones was successful in 98% of attempts and endoscopic palliation or percutaneous endoprothesis insertion were successful in 86% of malignant biliary obstructions.
Patients with metastatic disease would be unlikely to undergo major surgery and would be relatively more likely to be admitted for palliation.
Data on day 15 was compared with pre-treatment grade of hematuria in order to determine the efficacy of hypofractionated RT in palliation of macroscopic hematuria associated with advanced urinary bladder cancer.
Surgical palliation is by enteric anastomosis to the extrahepatic or selected intrahepatic segmental ducts, mainly segment III.
The PMA submission is based on a two-arm randomised controlled trial comparing patients undergoing ExAblate's MR guided focused ultrasound for palliation of painful bone metastases with patients undergoing a sham, or no therapy.
They] clearly do not promote palliation at the end of life," they added.
In October 2002, RITA again became the first company to receive specific FDA clearance, this time, for the palliation of pain associated with metastatic lesions involving bone.
When it does not serve moral good, the production of wealth as physical good is not a palliation of, but rather aggravates, the moral failure, just as a murderer's remaining physically alive is an aggravation, and not a palliation, of his soul's being mortally in sin.
Also often confused with passive euthanasia, this refers to cases when medical treatment is no longer indicated and all treatment except palliation (food, water, pain relief) is withdrawn.
There is an excellent explanation of the palliation of raised intracranial pressure through the administration of morphine or diamorphine, but for me the best chapter was `Drug profiles', which not only covers many of the indications for drugs such as cortico-steroids but also provides useful tables of the comparative anti-inflammatory potency as well as the side effects of many of these commonly used drugs.
The committee readily accepted that patients might be caused to the earlier as a consequence of palliation, and opined that the establishment of acceptable palliative treatment plans was a matter for the professions.
For more than a decade, Bio-Nucleonics has been providing us with Strontium Chloride Sr-89 for the palliation of painful bone metastases.