sedation

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sedation

1. a state of calm or reduced nervous activity
2. the administration of a sedative
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

sedation

[si′dā·shən]
(medicine)
A state of lessened activity.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tambem, segundo o Guideline for Palliative Sedation da Royal Dutch Medical Association, a sedacao continua e o subtipo de maior alcance de SP e visa reduzir a consciencia da pessoa doente ate o momento da morte (15).
In the case of ethical palliative sedation, it is understood that death will happen due to other causes, such as the underlying illness.
It should be noted that palliative sedation, if it does accelerate death, is not physician-assisted suicide but is actually active, voluntary euthanasia; it is death caused by a doctor's action, at the request of the patient (although it is likely that some doctors apply this procedure, without permission, to very sick patients who have no hope of recovery).
More than 50 amendments were made, including a series of important changes to the definitions of medically assisted dying, palliative care and continuous palliative sedation. The rights and responsibilities of doctors and other medical professionals were clarified, and specific reporting requirements regarding medically assisted deaths were added.
There may indeed be rare times in which a child's suffering can only be alleviated by palliative sedation. But that isn't a matter of conscious or unconscious.
Examples of the latter category include euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, withdrawal of life support measures, palliative sedation, foregoing medically provided nutrition and hydration, and organ donation after cardiac death.
This Act deals with what is generally referred to as medical assistance in dying, and proposes "terminal palliative sedation" as a care option for individuals suffering from incurable and debilitating illnesses who wish to exercise their decision-making power at this final stage of their life.
Palliative sedation: The use of non-opioid sedation that lowers the level of consciousness to the extent necessary for relief of awareness of refractory and unendurable symptoms.
Clinicians also should be familiar with distinctions among ethical issues in end-of-life care, including physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia, and palliative sedation (Table 4).
The attitudes of Indian palliative-care nurses and physicians to pain control and palliative sedation. Indian J Palliat Care 2011; 17: 33-41.