paludification

paludification

[pə‚lüd·ə·fə′kā·shən]
(ecology)
Bog expansion resulting from the gradual rising of the water table as accumulation of peat impedes water drainage.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Formed on flat lowlands without artificial drainage, Gleysols will be subject to paludification (with the formation of raw-humic and peaty humus covers).
Rees, "Paludification and forest retreat in northern oceanic environments," Annals of Botany, vol.
We will show in this study that the relation between climate and paludification (the formation of peatlands) in tropical mountain landscapes is still not completely understood and needs further investigation.
Eipurs Bog has formed due to the paludification of the sandy ground as a result of rising groundwater level and wet conditions during the small depression after the Ice Age.
In general, the distribution of plant macrofossils in cores BF-12, 9, 7, and 5 reflects a gradual hydrological change from a poorly drained area to the formation of a peatland and paludification as the water level decreased.
Organic Matter Deposition, Humification, and Paludification. Central to the formation of O and A horizons is the accumulation and decomposition of organic matter.
Firstly, due to rise in ground-water table, paludification, and overgrowing of relict lakes and lagoons isolated during the regression phases of the Baltic Sea.
Three possible explanations for this transition are proposed: 1) aquatic conditions could have prevailed from the beginning, and the white spruce and tamarack remains were deposited in the water from the surrounding upland, 2) the cone layer could represent a terrestrial forest that existed on overburden of a buried ice-mass that later melted and created a water-filled depression with associated aquatic flora, and 3) the cone layer could represent a terrestrial environment that was later subject to paludification from increases in meltwater from the retreating glacial ice to the north or from beaver activity.
Because decomposition proceeds more slowly in the more acidic environment of the bog-centre than at its margins, the accumulation of decay-resistant sphagnum eventually raises the surface to produce a domed or raised bog with a convex profile in a process known as paludification. According to some older theories of plant succession, this produced drier conditions and opened the way to eventual colonization by shrubs and small trees.
There are two main groups of wetlands: mineral wetlands, commonly situated in high-energy settings; and peatlands, situated in low-energy settings that undergo either terrestrialization or paludification during the course of their development.
The transition to a massive peat at 7,800 B.P., marked by a thin transition zone, was likely a result of paludification or lake filling.