panicle


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panicle

1. a compound raceme, occurring esp in grasses
2. any branched inflorescence

Panicle

 

a compound inflorescence with a main axis that develops lateral branches at various levels. These branches, in turn, produce smaller branches that bear flowers or small inflorescences (for example, the spikelets of grains and the capitula of Compositae). The branches may be tightly pressed to the central axis or may stand away from it. Spreading panicles have horizontal branches. A panicle that is tightly compressed and has short branches— for example, the spike of a grain (timothy, sweet vernal grass and foxtail)—is called a tassel.

panicle

[′pan·ə·kəl]
(botany)
A branched or compound raceme in which the secondary branches are often racemose as well.
References in periodicals archive ?
The increase in yield with foliar KNO3 spray is credited to the increase in number of tillers m-2, panicle length, grains panicle-1 and thousand grain weight.
In the second class (consisted of 6 cultivars), their average value greater than overall cultivars for such traits like plant height, leaf length, first iron toxicity score, panicle per square meter, number of tillers/stand, panicle length, number of spikelets, panicle weight, number of panicle branches, 100- seed weight and total grain weight.
Table 1: Variance analysis of tiller number, grain per panicle, 1000-grain weight, grain yield and shoot dry weight (biologic yield) Tiller number Grain per 1000-grain panicle weight Cultivar(A) 165.
Although the models generally explained a large portion of the variance in each endogenous variable, such was not the case for kernel weight and seeds per panicle.
In 2012, Cyptocephala alvarengai Rolston (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) was first observed feeding on panicles of irrigated rice in Goianira, Goias, Brazil.
Causes of grain discoloration: Grain discoloration caused by the involvement of many biotic and abiotic factors including microorganisms attack (fungal, bacterial and viral), high humidity, high moisture, panicle emergence stage, grain filling stage, high temperature, high wind pressure during pollination, weak plant defense system, nutrient deficiency, less plant population, immature grain filling, lack of proper pollination/fertilization, chemicals/fungicides, rainfall at maturity stage and grain lesion.
The panicle was cut and kept in a drying room until it lost sufficient moisture to be threshed (after 15 to 25 days, during which time the panicles were moved daily to avoid overheating).
Identifying this new player in panicle architecture may enable the design of plants with either enhanced or reduced panicle structures," stated Brutnell.
Finally they identified that SCM2 is identical to ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION1 (APO1) gene, which was previously identified to encode an F-box-containing protein involved in controlling the rachis branch number of the panicle.