distemper

(redirected from panleukopenia)
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distemper,

in veterinary medicine, highly contagious, catarrhal, often fatal disease of dogs. It also affects wolves, foxes, mink, raccoons, and ferrets. Distemper is caused by a filtrable virus that is airborne; it is also spread by infected utensils, brushes, and clothing. Symptoms are high fever, apathy, and lack of appetite with resulting dehydration and loss of weight. The respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts become involved, and there is vomiting and diarrhea. A dog may recover from the above signs and then develop nervous complications, i.e., convulsions, localized muscular twitches, weakness, and paralysis. Distemper in dogs can be controlled by immunizing each animal as early as possible with a modified live-virus vaccine.

distemper

[dis′tem·pər]
(veterinary medicine)
Any of several contagious virus diseases of mammals, especially the form occurring in dogs, marked by fever, respiratory inflammation, and destruction of myelinated nerve tissue.

distemper

A paint containing earth pigments, calcium carbonate, tinting colors, glue size, or casein, mixed with water; tempera.

distemper

1
any of various infectious diseases of animals, esp canine distemper, a highly contagious viral disease of dogs, characterized initially by high fever and a discharge from the nose and eyes

distemper

2 Art
1. a technique of painting in which the pigments are mixed with water, glue, size, etc., used for poster, mural, and scene painting
2. the paint used in this technique or any of various water-based paints, including, in Britain, whitewash
References in periodicals archive ?
--Feline panleukopenia can be associated with high fevers (103-107[degrees]F).
Panleukopenia is also a highly contagious and common viral disease.
Parvovirus, panleukopenia virus, calicivirus, salmonella, parasite eggs and ringworm spores can be especially troublesome; it requires rigorous attention to cleaning and disinfection to remove and inactivate these pathogens.
Latex agglutination test for detecting feline panleukopenia virus, canine parvovirus, and parvoviruses of fur animals.
One outbreak of fatal salmonellosis in cats has been reported after mild immunosuppression induced by live panleukopenia virus vaccination (7).
Other risks to your existing cats include feline leukemia, panleukopenia and feline immunodeficiency virus, so be sure to discuss having your adopted cat vaccinated with your veterinarian before bringing him or her into your house."
Lung samples from all four fends tested negative for canine distemper virus by RT-PCR (11), while those of three of four felids tested positive for a vaccine strain of feline panleukopenia virus (12), administered 2 weeks before death.
Bob most likely was exposed to feline panleukopenia virus, sometimes called feline distemper or feline parvo virus, either shortly before or shortly after birth.
Infection by Feline parvovirus was thought only to occur in cats (Feline panleukopenia virus, FPLV) or raccoons until the mid-1940s, when a similar disease with a mortality of up to 80% was observed in infected mink kits in Canada (1).
"Diseases like feline panleukopenia virus, feline leukemia virus, feline calicivirus and rabies are all devastating--and all preventable--via vaccination."
Young kittens may seem fearless when they demonstrate their acrobatic talents during play, but they're no match for the potentially deadly disease feline panleukopenia. Sometimes referred to as feline distemper, the disease is caused by the feline panleukopenia virus (FPV).
* Have the cat receive core vaccinations to protect him against panleukopenia, feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus (an upper respiratory infection) and rabies.