Panpsychism

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Panpsychism

 

an idealist concept of nature as universally animated. There are various historical forms of panpsychism. These range from the undifferentiated animism of primal religious beliefs and the hylozoism of ancient Greek natural philosophy to highly developed idealist doctrines on the soul and psychic reality as the genuine and sole essence of the world, including G. Leibniz’ concept of monads, the philosophical ideas of the 19th-century German psychophysicist G. T. Fechner, and the teachings of the 20th-century Swiss psychologist C. G. Jung.

References in periodicals archive ?
4) Beyond their shared rejection of Newton's ontology, I find the metaphysics of Leibniz and Blake to be analogous in several aspects, particularly insofar as both Leibniz's theory of monads and Blake's early work belong in a panpsychist tradition, which posits an infinite mind-like nature to all material beings.
Such assertions place him in the panpsychist tradition that maintains the presence of spiritual mentality interfused with matter.
In All Religions are One, Blake echoes this panpsychist idea.
In the appendix to the Clarke correspondence, Leibniz makes the panpsychist claim, "Naturally, every simple Substance has Perception" (A Collection of Papers, 377), which posits the same non-organic spiritual nature of perception that Blake argues for in the "b" series of No Natural Religion.
54) For Leibniz and Blake, the machine of organic perception and empirical knowledge cannot reveal the infinite in all things, which characterizes the panpsychist, non-Newtonian universe in both of their metaphysics.
Becoming native' contrasts the modernist concept of property with the panpsychist idea of indwelling.