panuveitis


Also found in: Medical.

panuveitis

[pan‚yü·vē′īd·əs]
(medicine)
Inflammation of the entire uveal tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
In PubMed, the term "multifocal choroiditis and panuveitis," using all or part of the term, brought up 184 articles.
Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease is a bilateral granulomatous panuveitis associated with an autoimmune reaction against melanocytes and associated with multisystemic involvement [58, 59].
The choroid has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many posterior segment inflammatory disorders, including Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome (VKH) [3], Behcet's disease [4, 5], sarcoidosis [6, 7], birdshot chorioretinopathy [8, 9], sympathetic ophthalmia [10,11], panuveitis [12], toxoplasmosis [13], and posterior scleritis [14].
Patients were categorized as: having anterior uveitis if the inflammation was primarily located in the anterior segment; having intermediate uveitis if the vitreous body was primarily involved or the inflammation involved both the anterior segment and the vitreous body or pars planitis with characteristic pars plana exudation; having posterior uveitis if retinochoroidal lesions predominated; or having panuveitis if the inflammation involved all the compartments of the eye.
Uveitic manifestations include hypopyon panuveitis, nonocclusive retinal periphlebitis, and neuroretinitis or papillopathy [2].
Optic nerve involvement with panuveitis in Sweet syndrome.
Ten patients had idiopathic intermediate uveitis, 9 patients had Behcet's disease, 10 had idiopathic panuveitis, and twelve patients had presumed ocular tuberculosis uveitis.
Patients usually present with bilateral nongranulomatous panuveitis and retinal vasculitis.
The typical form of ocular involvement is bilateral panuveitis and retinal vasculitis.
In the CLS-TA treatment arm, patients all had statistically significant visual acuity gains compared to the sham arm: anterior - 14.4 letters, intermediate - 13.4 letters, posterior - 15.6 letters, panuveitis -12.0 letters.
([section]) Neurologic symptoms and conditions include ataxia, disorientation, sudden blindness, encephalitis, calcifications, and intracranial space occupying lesions; ophthalmic symptoms and conditions include chorioretinitis, panuveitis, posterior uveitis, and vitritis.
[3] Herein, we report the first case of axial SpA in whom recurrent attacks of panuveitis paradoxically developed under golimumab treatment in the light of literature data.