papaya

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papaya

(pəpī`ə), soft-stemmed tree (Carica papaya) of tropical America resembling a palm with a crown of palmately lobed leaves. It is cultivated for its melonlike yellow fruits eaten raw or cooked and, more recently, for the juice which has become a commercial item. The juice contains the enzyme papain, somewhat similar to pepsin and digestant in action; the enzyme is used in commercial meat tenderizers. The papaya is also called melon tree and pawpaw. In the Caribbean area the fruit is called fruta bomba. Several other Andean species, as well as the genus Jacartia, also have edible fruits. The papaya is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Violales, family Caricaceae.
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papaya

papaya

Grows up to 30ft (10m) High in vitamin A, B, C, carotenoids, fiber, phytochemicals, phenols, enzymes and anti-fungals. Ripe fruit can be eaten with skin and seeds. Unripe fruit is usually cooked. Young leaves also edible and used against malaria. Seeds are anti-parasite and can be ground and used like black pepper. Fruit is high in papain, a proteindigesting enzyme. Green papayas used in some parts of the world as a contraceptive and abortive if eaten in large amounts. Seeds even used for male contraception. Reduces effects of progesterone. Papaya juice used for cancer therapy. Papayas are used for E. Coli, Staph, Salmonella and other infections, both bacterial and viral. Great for digestion, indigestion, gas, heartburn, helps digest food. A great desert simply cut open, squeeze lemon on top, spoon fresh out of skin.

Papaya

 

(Carica papaya), a fruit tree of the family Papayaceae (Caricaceae). Five to seven large fingerlike leaves on long stems are attached in bunches at the top of a short (4-8 m) branchless trunk. The dioecious blossoms are yellowish white. The stamens are in the racemes, and the pistils, which grow singly, are in the axil. The flowers are either diclinous or hermaphroditic. Although the papaya grows rapidly without special soils, its life span is short and it cannot survive frost. The papaya is cultivated in the tropics; a wild counterpart is not known. Its fruit, which resembles a melon, is used for food, and its milky juice is used to make the enzyme papain.

REFERENCE

Siniagin, I. I.Tropicheskoe zemledelie. Moscow, 1968.

S. K. CHEREPANOV

papaya

a Caribbean evergreen tree, Carica papaya, with a crown of large dissected leaves and large green hanging fruit: family Caricaceae
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the papaya tree grows well in all types of soil between 68[degrees]F and 82[degrees]F, the plant is very sensitive to subtle changes in heat, light, or humidity, and these subtleties are transferred to the fruit.
Papaya trees tower over John (aka Johnny Papaya) Burns and his wife Natividad's all-organic garden, where they grow over 80% of their food, in place of the typical suburban yard in Sarasota, Florida.
In addition, papaya trees lack an anchoring taproot, so whole orchards are vulnerable to being flattened by the 30- to 40-mile-an-hour winds that blow in from the Pacific.
Since the papaya tree can be female, male or hermaphrodite it seems normal that the pollen can be carried out by wind and/or insects to ensure the pollination and fruit development.
You can acquire Babaco papayas through the Papaya Tree Nursery in Granada Hills, which is open by appointment.
This plant, which comes from West Africa, is available through Papaya Tree Nursery in Granada Hills.
The tree tomato, passion vine, Surinam cherry and other exotic fruits may be found at the Papaya Tree Nursery in Granada Hills.
Down another corridor, a pair of tall Europeans appear deep in discussion in front of a crop of papaya trees.
Cahayon said papaya trees used to line the place now featuring rosal plants, after the city government declared the fragrant white flower as the city flower.
The Ringspot virus that was killing Hawaii's papaya trees was spreading in Asia as well.
We were on our way to Dapit Alim, a healing place somewhere in the mountain in Tubod, when we spotted a couple of golden papaya trees along the way.
In Malir district, the virus attacked on the papaya trees growing in field induced great losses to the farmer's income.