Paradise

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Paradise:

see Eden, Garden ofEden, Garden of,
in the Bible, first home to humankind. In it were the trees of life and of the knowledge of good and evil. Having eaten the forbidden fruit of the latter tree, Adam and Eve were banished from the garden and God's presence.
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; heavenheaven,
blissful upper realm or state entered after death; in Western monotheistic religions it is the place where the just see God face to face (sometimes called the beatific vision).
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.

Paradise,

town (1990 pop. 25,406), Butte co., N central Calif., located along a broad ridge in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada range, inc. 1979. It is mainly residential with a growing population. Cattle are raised and fruits, olives, nuts, wheat, and nursery stock are grown. Gold was discovered nearby in 1859. A wildfire in 2018 largely destroyed the town.

Paradise

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Paradise, asteroid 2,791 (the 2,791st asteroid to be discovered, on February 13, 1977), is approximately 20 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 3.7 years. Paradise is a concept asteroid, named after the Garden of Eden. J. Lee Lehman asserts that if this asteroid is well-aspected in a natal chart, the native believes paradise can be found in this existence. If, however, “the asteroid is poorly aspect, then the person is less than optimistic that Paradise exists outside of the movies.” Jacob Schwartz gives Paradise’s astrological significance as “beliefs in perfection.”

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Lehman, J. Lee. The Ultimate Asteroid Book. West Chester, PA: Whitford Press, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Paradise

 

according to most religious teaching, for example, in Christianity, Islam, Judaism, and Buddhism, the place of eternal bliss for the souls of the righteous.

Sources for the concept of paradise go back to primitive beliefs in the existence of the soul beyond the grave. In the Old Testament, paradise is depicted as a beautiful garden in which the “first man and woman,” Adam and Eve, lived until they were driven out after they fell from grace. In the subsequent development of Christian doctrine, paradise was conceptualized as a place to which the righteous returned after death.

In many religions, the bliss of paradise is contrasted with the torments of the sinners in hell. Unlike the detailed elaborations of conditions in hell, however, representations of paradise are vague and sketchy. The concepts of “paradise” and “hell” are used by the clergy for the religious aims of influencing the consciousness and feelings of believers.

paradise

1. The court of the atrium in front of a church.
2. The garth of a cloister.
3. A Persian pleasure garden, usually elaborately planted.

Paradise

poetic name for heaven. [World Rel.: NCE, 1213]
See: Heaven

Paradise

See also Heaven, Utopia.
Bali
Indonesian island; thought of as garden of Eden. [Geography: NCE, 215–216]
Brigadoon
magical Scottish village that materializes once every 100 years. [Am. Music: Payton, 100–101]
Canaan
ancient region on Jordan river; promised by God to Abraham. [O.T.: Genesis 12:5–10]
Earthly Paradise
place of beauty, peace, and immortality, believed in the Middle Ages to exist in some undiscovered land. [Eur. Legend: Benét, 298]
Eden
earthly garden of luxury; abode of Adam and Eve. [O.T.: Genesis 2:8]
Elysium
(Elysian Fields) abode of the blessed in afterlife. [Gk. & Rom. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary]
Garden of the Hesperides
quiet garden of the gods where golden apples grew. [Gk. Lit.: Hippolytus; Gk. Myth.: Gaster, 25]
Happy Hunting Ground
paradise for American Indians. [Am. Culture: Jobes, 724]
Happy Valley
beautiful spot in Kashmir’s Jhelum Valley. [Indian Hist.: Payton, 300]
hissu
where trees bear fruits of lapis lazuli. [Babylonian Lit.: Gilgamesh]
land of milk and honey
proverbial ideal of plenty and happiness. [Western Cult.: Brewer Dictionary]
Land of the Lotophagi
African land where eating lotos fruit produced amnesia and indolence. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey; Br. Lit.: “The Lotos-Eaters” in Norton, 733–736]
Nirvana
eternal bliss and the end of all earthly suffering. [Indian Religion: Jobes, 1175]
Shangri-la
utopia hidden in the Himalayas. [Br. Lit.: Lost Horizon]
Suhkavati
garden of jeweled trees and dulcet-voiced birds. [Buddhist Myth.: Gaster, 24]
Timbuktu
fabled land of wealth and splendor. [Eur. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1084]
Tlapallan
land of luxuriance and red sunrise. [Aztec Myth.: Gaster, 25]

paradise

1. heaven as the ultimate abode or state of the righteous
2. Islam the sensual garden of delights that the Koran promises the faithful after death
3. (according to some theologians) the intermediate abode or state of the just prior to the Resurrection of Jesus, as in Luke 23:43
4. the place or state of happiness enjoyed by Adam before the first sin; the Garden of Eden

Paradise

Paradise is a subsystem (a set of packages) developed to implement inter-processes, inter-tasks and inter-machine communication for Ada programs under Unix. This subsystem gives the user full access to files, pipes, sockets (both Unix and Internet) and pseudo-devices.

Paradise has been ported to Sun, DEC, Sony MIPS, Verdex compiler, DEC compiler, Alsys/Systeam compiler.

Version 2.0 of the library. E-mail: <paradise-info@cnam.cnam.fr>.

Paradise

An earlier family of graphics cards for PCs from the Paradise subsidiary of Western Digital Corporation, Irvine, CA.
References in periodicals archive ?
In it he attempts to extend the patristic theology of Merton's The New Man to the widening of religious consciousness that included Merton's encounter with paradisal reality in the figures of the Buddha in Sri Lanka (Ceylon) in 1968, an electrifying encounter that was originally recorded in the Asian Journal (1973).
He called it the most significant religious experience of his life, and, as it was in the beginning, it happened in a paradisal garden, the Buddhist cloister of Polonnaruwa, where trees, rocks, statues and sky all made evocations of Eden, just days before his death in Bangkok.
exist on different levels, depending on the intelligence of the conceiving mind." (24) Paradisal time is good because it is viewed as God's time, who is the source of all that is good.
Scholars have long pointed out how the search for paradisal islands was an important stimulus to voyages of discovery from the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries.
This Oxford, "submerged now and obliterated" (23), is one of Ryder's idylls with Sebastian Flyte and at the furthest remove, in its carefree pastoralism, from the Prologue's world of madness and "euthanasia." In this past of youth and friendship, Ryder tells us, lay an almost paradisal bliss, one sheltered behind "that low door in the wall, [.
(31) For the souls are primarily engaged in atonement, prayer, mutual charity, and condemnation of their past unholy lives, as is clear, for instance, from the nine lines Dante the poet has Arnaut Daniel utter in condemnation of his past life, benevolent acceptance of his present suffering, and hopeful looking forward to the future paradisal happiness (Purg.
The leader, for Pound, was someone who could draw from the mere drift of people the paradisal "flower" of community, the very same blossom found in the poem, "In a Station of the Metro," which became any number of paradisal cities and times throughout the Cantos, as in the lost city of Ecbatan, whose terraces were the color of stars.
"then it beckoned new age mutants forth from simmering dumplings in the Panhandle or they flew in on UFOs and founded a tax exempt non-profit religious foundation under California state law for the ecstatic transformation of earth in paradise love gifts planted the paradisal sanctuaries for all wildflower people forever they called it Electric Tibet or a `trippy body cream for groovy loving' depending on my mood some park benches grew pranksters who fed our heads and introduced you to the only god in the world for you she was special you were shy and said `pleased to meet you' anyhow behind the sheer Indian print sheet a pot was boiling Digger(3) stew for dinner they served a bowl and the little alphabet pastas spelled out Free Frame of Reference solid!"(127-28)
If Isfahan offers miracles, its stereotypically paradisal otherness is comically infected: when roses bloom there out of season, as Yahya wryly explains, it's because they're "imitation, from Times Square" (18).
In Rennie's analysis, the drive for political dominance, detected everywhere in earlier postcolonial criticism, becomes only one of many human impulses activated by the prospect of paradisal islands in a faraway sea.
As she points out, even though Milton called his poem Paradise Lost, "the far larger portion of its earthly scenes devoted to keeping paradise than to losing it creates a taste for blessedness and reactivates paradisal choices for life not only beyond this world but in it" (1).
Once ashore in the paradisal islands now called the Bahamas, she finds herself admiring the natural ease of the naked inhabitants; and it's not long before she discovers the pleasures of island life, sex on the beach with the handsome and sympathetic Pinzon and, most daringly, sea-bathing: