Paradise

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Paradise:

see Eden, Garden ofEden, Garden of,
in the Bible, first home to humankind. In it were the trees of life and of the knowledge of good and evil. Having eaten the forbidden fruit of the latter tree, Adam and Eve were banished from the garden and God's presence.
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; heavenheaven,
blissful upper realm or state entered after death; in Western monotheistic religions it is the place where the just see God face to face (sometimes called the beatific vision).
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.

Paradise,

uninc. town (1990 pop. 25,406), Butte co., N central Calif., in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada range. It is mainly residential with a growing population. Cattle are raised and fruits, olives, nuts, wheat, and nursery stock are grown. Gold was discovered nearby in 1859.

Paradise

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Paradise, asteroid 2,791 (the 2,791st asteroid to be discovered, on February 13, 1977), is approximately 20 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 3.7 years. Paradise is a concept asteroid, named after the Garden of Eden. J. Lee Lehman asserts that if this asteroid is well-aspected in a natal chart, the native believes paradise can be found in this existence. If, however, “the asteroid is poorly aspect, then the person is less than optimistic that Paradise exists outside of the movies.” Jacob Schwartz gives Paradise’s astrological significance as “beliefs in perfection.”

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Lehman, J. Lee. The Ultimate Asteroid Book. West Chester, PA: Whitford Press, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Paradise

 

according to most religious teaching, for example, in Christianity, Islam, Judaism, and Buddhism, the place of eternal bliss for the souls of the righteous.

Sources for the concept of paradise go back to primitive beliefs in the existence of the soul beyond the grave. In the Old Testament, paradise is depicted as a beautiful garden in which the “first man and woman,” Adam and Eve, lived until they were driven out after they fell from grace. In the subsequent development of Christian doctrine, paradise was conceptualized as a place to which the righteous returned after death.

In many religions, the bliss of paradise is contrasted with the torments of the sinners in hell. Unlike the detailed elaborations of conditions in hell, however, representations of paradise are vague and sketchy. The concepts of “paradise” and “hell” are used by the clergy for the religious aims of influencing the consciousness and feelings of believers.

paradise

1. The court of the atrium in front of a church.
2. The garth of a cloister.
3. A Persian pleasure garden, usually elaborately planted.

Paradise

poetic name for heaven. [World Rel.: NCE, 1213]
See: Heaven

Paradise

See also Heaven, Utopia.
Bali
Indonesian island; thought of as garden of Eden. [Geography: NCE, 215–216]
Brigadoon
magical Scottish village that materializes once every 100 years. [Am. Music: Payton, 100–101]
Canaan
ancient region on Jordan river; promised by God to Abraham. [O.T.: Genesis 12:5–10]
Earthly Paradise
place of beauty, peace, and immortality, believed in the Middle Ages to exist in some undiscovered land. [Eur. Legend: Benét, 298]
Eden
earthly garden of luxury; abode of Adam and Eve. [O.T.: Genesis 2:8]
Elysium
(Elysian Fields) abode of the blessed in afterlife. [Gk. & Rom. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary]
Garden of the Hesperides
quiet garden of the gods where golden apples grew. [Gk. Lit.: Hippolytus; Gk. Myth.: Gaster, 25]
Happy Hunting Ground
paradise for American Indians. [Am. Culture: Jobes, 724]
Happy Valley
beautiful spot in Kashmir’s Jhelum Valley. [Indian Hist.: Payton, 300]
hissu
where trees bear fruits of lapis lazuli. [Babylonian Lit.: Gilgamesh]
land of milk and honey
proverbial ideal of plenty and happiness. [Western Cult.: Brewer Dictionary]
Land of the Lotophagi
African land where eating lotos fruit produced amnesia and indolence. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey; Br. Lit.: “The Lotos-Eaters” in Norton, 733–736]
Nirvana
eternal bliss and the end of all earthly suffering. [Indian Religion: Jobes, 1175]
Shangri-la
utopia hidden in the Himalayas. [Br. Lit.: Lost Horizon]
Suhkavati
garden of jeweled trees and dulcet-voiced birds. [Buddhist Myth.: Gaster, 24]
Timbuktu
fabled land of wealth and splendor. [Eur. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1084]
Tlapallan
land of luxuriance and red sunrise. [Aztec Myth.: Gaster, 25]

paradise

1. heaven as the ultimate abode or state of the righteous
2. Islam the sensual garden of delights that the Koran promises the faithful after death
3. (according to some theologians) the intermediate abode or state of the just prior to the Resurrection of Jesus, as in Luke 23:43
4. the place or state of happiness enjoyed by Adam before the first sin; the Garden of Eden

Paradise

Paradise is a subsystem (a set of packages) developed to implement inter-processes, inter-tasks and inter-machine communication for Ada programs under Unix. This subsystem gives the user full access to files, pipes, sockets (both Unix and Internet) and pseudo-devices.

Paradise has been ported to Sun, DEC, Sony MIPS, Verdex compiler, DEC compiler, Alsys/Systeam compiler.

Version 2.0 of the library. E-mail: <paradise-info@cnam.cnam.fr>.

Paradise

An earlier family of graphics cards for PCs from the Paradise subsidiary of Western Digital Corporation, Irvine, CA.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, it appears to be consistent with Quranic paradisiacal imagery--paradise in the Quran is constantly depicted as a place characterized by its close relationship with sweet waters.
This is undoubtedly a Kabbalistic allusion to the breaking of vessels that corresponds to the end of the paradisiacal state of man and language and suggests the hope of tikkun olam, the messianic healing of the world.
The Domain of Arnheim", a revised and greatly elaborated version of Poe's "Landscape-Garden", provides a splendid visionary image of the paradisiacal landscape garden.
The "village" reverenced his literacy, young Washington included, and he represented a figure on leave from that paradisiacal place that the young enslaved Washington imagined.
She physically and emotionally seeks her mate in distinct nations and theoretical dimensions as both the living and the dead purify their souls in Purgatory to realize a peace in some sort of paradisiacal afterlife together.
The set is enchanting, with the dark, gothic castle design beautifully contrasted by the paradisiacal swan filled lake.
Political utopianism is tyranny disguised as a desirable, workable, and even paradisiacal governing ideology.
So in his early years, he worked in this agricultural collective and experienced the hardships and rewards of this difficult life: the struggle against heat, dust and malaria as well as the paradisiacal flowing rivers, fruit gardens and lush vegetation.
Pic is set on the French Riviera in 1915, where the verdant and paradisiacal Renoir estate offers shelter from the horrors of WWI.
Upon conducting a comparison between the terms used to criticize sectarianism - as being the main cause for all the disasters in our region and an epidemic induced by colonization and nurtured by Israel in order to tint our good life in light of the paradisiacal brotherhood where lambs live alongside wolves - and the serious studies aimed at understanding this phenomenon and placing it under a historic and social framework, the comparison indicates that, even in a country like Lebanon where social and political studies have been abundant since the 1960s, we have not paid an adequate amount of attention to this phenomenon and to its amazing ability to revive and produce differences between people living in close and even geographically intertwined areas.
The great palaces of the kings of Persia, the clay fortress wall in Bam, the tomb of biblical prophet Daniel, paradisiacal gardens, ancient bazaars, and many other things are symbols of Iran.
I spent most of this March and part of April in Tunisia, but you hardly need that long to realize that the country is paradisiacal compared with its violent, dysfunctional neighbors.