New Journalism

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New Journalism,

intensely subjective approach to journalistic writing prevalent in the United States during the 1960s and 70s, incorporating stylistic techniques associated with fiction in order to produce a vivid and immediate nonfiction style. During a time marked by political, social, and cultural upheaval, New Journalism's practitioners adopted what they considered to be exciting and appropriate methods of reporting, combining personal impressions and opinions, reconstructing dialogue and slang, and writing from the point of view of their subjects. Writers who used this idiosyncratic style include Tom WolfeWolfe, Tom
(Thomas Kennerly Wolfe, Jr.), 1931–2018, American journalist and novelist, b. Richmond, Va., B.A. Washington and Lee Univ., 1951, Ph.D. Yale, 1957. He began his writing career as a newspaper reporter.
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 (who coined the term), Hunter S. Thompson, Joan DidionDidion, Joan
, 1934–, American writer, b. Sacramento, Calif., grad. Univ. of California, Berkeley, 1956. Her works often explore the despair of contemporary American life, a condition she views as produced by the disintegration of morality and values.
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, George Plimpton, Jimmy BreslinBreslin, Jimmy
(James Earl Breslin), 1928–2017, American journalist, b. Queens, N.Y. A reporter, columnist, and author, he was a tough and witty voice for working-class New Yorkers. He began as a newspaper copy boy in the late 1940s and soon became a sportswriter.
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, Gay Talese, and, in their nonfiction works, Norman MailerMailer, Norman
(Norman Kingsley Mailer), 1923–2007, American writer, b. Long Branch, N.J., grad. Harvard, 1943. He grew up in Brooklyn, N.Y., served in the army during World War II, and at the age of 25 published The Naked and the Dead (1948).
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 and Truman CapoteCapote, Truman
, 1924–84, American author, b. New Orleans as Truman Streckfus Persons. During his lifetime, the witty, diminutive writer was a well-known public personage, hobnobbing with the rich and famous and frequently appearing in the popular media, before he lapsed
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. Among the magazines most noted for publishing essays in the genre were The New Yorker, Esquire, New York, and Rolling Stone.

Bibliography

See T. Wolfe and E. W. Johnson, ed., The New Journalism (1973); M. Weingarten, The Gang That Wouldn't Write Straight (2009).