parallel


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Related to parallel: Parallel computing, Parallel universe, parallel software

parallel

1. separated by an equal distance at every point; never touching or intersecting
2. Music
a. (of two or more parts or melodies) moving in similar motion but keeping the same interval apart throughout
b. denoting successive chords in which the individual notes move in parallel motion
3. Computing operating on several items of information, instructions, etc., simultaneously
4. Maths one of a set of parallel lines, planes, etc.
5. any of the imaginary lines around the earth parallel to the equator, designated by degrees of latitude ranging from 0° at the equator to 90° at the poles
6. 
a. a configuration of two or more electrical components connected between two points in a circuit so that the same voltage is applied to each (esp in the phrase in parallel)
b. (as modifier): a parallel circuit

Parallel

Always the same distance apart; thus two parallel lines never meet.

Parallel

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

The orbits of most of the planets in the solar system lie in approximately the same geometric plane, which is why an astrological chart using only a two-dimensional representation rather than one with three dimensions is drawn. There is, nevertheless, a variation in the tilt or angle of these orbits, so at any given time most of the planets are either north or south of the celestial equator (the plane described by projecting Earth’s equator against the background of the stars). This variation is measured in degrees of declination. Two planets are parallel when they are on the same side of the celestial equator and have the same degree of declination. Planets with the same declination are said to have a relationship similar to a conjunction.

parallel

[′par·ə‚lel]
(computer science)
Simultaneous transmission of, storage of, or logical operations on the parts of a word, character, or other subdivision of a word in a computer, using separate facilities for the various parts.
(electricity)
Connected to the same pair of terminals. Also known as multiple; shunt.
(geodesy)
A circle on the surface of the earth, parallel to the plane of the equator and connecting all points of equal latitude. Also known as circle of longitude; parallel of latitude.
(mathematics)
Lines are parallel in a Euclidean space if they lie in a common plane and do not intersect.
Planes are parallel in a Euclidean three-dimensional space if they do not intersect.
A circle parallel to the primary great circle of a sphere or spheroid.
A curve is parallel to a given curve C if it consists of points that are a fixed distance from C along lines perpendicular to C.
(physics)
Of two or more displacements or other vectors, having the same direction.

parallel

The line joining all points that are at the same latitude (i.e., parallel to the equator). See latitude. See also parallel of latitude.
References in classic literature ?
extending in parallel lines between us and the valley we desired to reach.
They evidently had gone far to the left of our course, for they were now almost behind us as we ran parallel to the coast; but we were not much afraid of being overtaken in the wind that was blowing.
The black, in defence, aimed a kick at Jerry, who, leaping in instead of away--another inheritance from Terrence--avoided the bare foot and printed a further red series of parallel lines on the dark leg.
Away, indeed - they are making directly to our left, parallel to the now steadily blazing and smoking wall.
In the dust of years that lay thick upon the floor--leading from the door by which they had entered, straight across the room to within a yard of Manton's crouching corpse--were three parallel lines of footprints--light but definite impressions of bare feet, the outer ones those of small children, the inner a woman's.
The parallel between her mother's position and her own position was now complete.
They were long and narrow furrows sunk between parallel ridges, bordering generally upon the edges of the craters.
It was mathematically at its perigee, and at the zenith of the twenty-eighth parallel.
If a number of equal spheres be described with their centres placed in two parallel layers; with the centre of each sphere at the distance of radius x sqrt(2) or radius x 1.
though exceedingly fractured, yet remained standing; but the vast buttresses (at right angles to them, and therefore parallel to the walls that fell) were in many cases cut clean off, as if by a chisel, and hurled to the ground.
Miss Brobity at that time kept, I will not call it the rival establishment to the establishment at the Nuns' House opposite, but I will call it the other parallel establishment down town.
Idiotic propositions of a parallel nature have been freely offered for my acceptance, and I have been called upon to admit that I would give Poor Law relief to anybody, anywhere, anyhow.

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