paraphasia


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to paraphasia: echolalia, paraphrasing

paraphasia

[‚par·ə′fā·zhə]
(psychology)
The erroneous production of unintended words in speech that is a feature in some forms of aphasia.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
While linguistic disorders-in which repetition is preserved and speech output is diminished and that anomia and paraphasias accompany-are attributed to ventrolateral and ventral anterior nuclei lesions, a fluent aphasia is seen with pulvinar and posterior lateral nucleus lesions.
When trying to repeat a sentence, sufferers of Wernicke's aphasia might use several paraphasias and add extraneous syllables as well, an effect called augmentation.
Here, spontaneous speech is characterized by searches for required words and frequent verbal paraphasias.
His word-retrieval impairment fell in the mild-to-moderate range, and his errors consisted of semantic paraphasias for both nouns and verbs.
As the disease progresses the destruction of temporo-parietal areas of the left hemisphere produces aphasic disorders: problems of syntactic and discourse comprehension, semantic paraphasias and paragrammatism in production.
In progressive nonfluent aphasia, the ability to match semantically related objects is preserved, but nonfluent speech, phonemic paraphasias (word substitutions), and agrammatism occur.
The third clinical variant, termed logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA) by Gorno-Tempini et al, (9,13) is characterised by slow spontaneous speech output with frequent word-finding pauses and phonemic paraphasias.
However, the majority of her classifiable errors were semantic paraphasias (e.
A therapy goal for individuals with these problems may be to reduce the use of generic terms or paraphasias.
Depending on the specific syndrome, 65% to 70% of all phonemic paraphasias involved a switch of a single feature.
However, while Patient l's confrontational naming skills were intact, Patient 2 did less well on the Boston Naming Test (Kaplan, Goodglass & Weintraub, 1983), with his low average performance characterised by many semantic paraphasias.