paraphrase

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paraphrase

1. an expression of a statement or text in other words, esp in order to clarify
2. the practice of making paraphrases

Paraphrase

 

(1) In literature, the retelling of a literary work in one’s own words; also, an abridged exposition, or adaptation, of a long literary work, such as a children’s edition of Cervantes’ Don Quixote or Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe. The term was also used to designate the rendering of a prose text into verse. An example is Three Paraphrased Odes (1743, published 1744), three versified renderings of the 143rd Psalm by V. K. Tredia-kovskii, M. V. Lomonosov, and A. P. Sumarokov. The aim of this work was to ascertain which verse meter was most appropriate for the high style. Some linguists consider paraphrase a synonym for periphrasis.

(2) In music, a term widely used in the 19th century for a virtuoso instrumental fantasia, usually for piano, based on themes from such sources as popular songs and operatic arias. These themes often undergo considerable change. Most paraphrases are classed with light music. A number of masterly paraphrases were composed by F. Liszt, such as those based on themes from Verdi’s opera Rigoletto and on the polka from Tchaikovsky’s opera Eugene Onegin.

References in periodicals archive ?
I had an epiphany--since my mentor wanted me to emphasize paraphrasing in my lesson, why not have the students practice paraphrasing Taylor Swift lyrics?
Rus and colleagues' approach only used similarity to decide paraphrasing, ignoring dissimilarities which could be important to the final decision.
Results showed that students plagiarized more when tackling a complex paragraph than when facing a simple paragraph; providing data that students do in fact possess skills necessary for paraphrasing but students may be impeded from applying those skills when dealing with rigorous text (Roig).
Thus the question: Can paraphrasing practice help students define plagiarism?
Make your paraphrasing plagiarism-proof with a coat of E-Primer
I'd be better off dead." In response, the negotiator might express understanding by paraphrasing the subject's words, "You've lost your job and your wife, there is no one to turn to, and you're not sure if you want to go on living."
A strict interpretation renders such "paraphrasing" as constituting a case of plagiarism, particularly if the "voice" of the original author is preserved in the rewritten version (see Campbell & Ballou, 1974).
Questioning and paraphrasing by both hearing and deaf persons can help clarify the intent and meaning of a written message when necessary.
Paraphrasing will assist in subsequently recalling what the interviewee said, and will also temper the natural tendency to listen only for points that are easy to understand, or fit into preconceptions.
If we take the time to listen well, and to communicate to the other person that we are listening by paraphrasing back what we believe he or she meant, Dr.
This news item was the starting point for Anne-Mie Van Kerckhoven's latest project, "Anti-Sade." Paraphrasing the news report but changing terms like "the standard model of physics" and "antimatter" into "the standard model of moral philosophy" and "anti-Sade," the content acquired at times a subversive, allusive, and above all ironic tone.