parasite drag


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Related to parasite drag: Induced drag

parasite drag

[′par·ə‚sīt ‚drag]
(fluid mechanics)
The portion of the total drag of an aircraft exclusive of the induced drag of the wings.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

parasite drag

parasite drag
The resistance of the air produced by any part of the airplane that does not produce lift. The parasitic drag is directly proportional to the size (S), the square of the speed (V2), the density (ρ) of the air, and the degree to which the body is streamlined. Parasite drag is further divided into skin friction, form drag, and interference drag. Parasite drag is directly proportional to the square of the speed. See also skin friction, form drag, and interference drag.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
The most efficient cruising speed is found at the bottom of the total drag curve, itself formed by combing the curves for induced and parasite drag. But that speed usually is painfully slow, so most operators opt for something higher on the parasite drag curve.
Parasite drag is the kind of drag produced when we lower the landing gear of a retractable airplane or stick our arm out the window of a moving car.
Max L/D is that point at which the wing is producing the greatest ratio of lift to drag and where induced drag, and parasite drag are equal.
Drag," above right, summing up how increasing speed brings increasing parasite drag and decreasing induced drag, resulting in a happy minimum of both total drag and required thrust, which occurs at the optimum lift-to-drag ratio, or L/[D.sub.max].
Parasite drag, of course, is the sum of pressure and friction drag resulting from the airplane's basic configuration and is independent of lift.