parasitic absorption

parasitic absorption

[¦par·ə¦sid·ik əb′sȯrp·shən]
(nucleonics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
This application demands very damage-tolerant optics, very low optical loss because the powers are extremely high, and we don't want parasitic absorption or scatter--even a really tiny fraction of light getting scattered out.
On the other hand, a parasitic absorption within NPs could significantly hamper the plasmonic effect [45,59] if the NPs exceed optimal size or agglomeration takes place.
In addition to careful design regarding the location, concentration, and size of the NPs it has been stressed on that the shell should be pinhole free to ensure the protection against electrolyte, but on the other hand the shell should be as thin as possible to utilize the plasmonic effect [39, 40, 45, 52, 57] and to reduce parasitic absorption within a shell.
This creates a very low concentration of the [Ag.sub.EG] NPs at the edges of the DSSCs and a very high concentration in the centre which increases the parasitic absorption within the NPs and significantly decreases the [J.sub.SC].
However, in actual a-Si:H solar cells, m does not exceed values of about 20 due to parasitic absorption losses [11].
The parasitic absorption change in the TCO is discussed elsewhere [18].