parastate

parastate

[′par·ə‚stāt]
(atomic physics)
A state of a diatomic molecule in which the spins of the nuclei are antiparallel.
References in periodicals archive ?
and Israel, not only from Iran but also from hybrid groups like Hezbollah, Hamas, the Taliban, and Islamic State, which operate as both parastate entities and terrorist organizations.
Very often their approaches were the prioritization of state and parastate media.
According to British mass media, the aim of Russia in Ukraine is "[...] to carve out a 'puppet parastate' in Eastern Ukraine" (The Guardian, 2015, february 6).
The experiment was conducted at a farm located in the municipality of Moju (1[degrees]54'14.33"S; 48[degrees]46'07.53"W), a mesoregion of the northeastern region of Parastate, Brazil.
Despite the undermining, we continued our efforts and we prevented Denktash and his friends in Turkey (often referred to as the "parastate") to make the negotiation process fail.
Challenged and cornered, reframed as greedy capitalists in judiciary courts and popular media, the landowners adopted, together with a variety of state actors, armed forces, and parastate groups, violent methods to interrupt the ongoing revolution: illegal means to keep the law at work.
The Parastate in Colombia: Political Violence and the Restructuring in Barrancabermeja.
Christopher Loss's theoretical approach to a twentieth-century history of federal involvement in higher education is grounded in American political development (APD), which holds "that a combination of public, private, and voluntary institutions--from executive branch agencies to military to big business and charitable foundations--gives the American state its physical form across space and time" (Loss 2011, 2), a situation that enabled higher education to grow into a "parastate." Adopting a survey approach to understanding the history of higher education, Loss begins his analysis with World War I and the New Deal administrative state (a period that he argues is characterized by bureaucracy), then moves to the Second World War and the Cold War, characterizing it as a period of democracy.
Bearing in mind the impossibility the contacts, communication and cooperation with the emigration to be conducted through the official state bodies, such as the example with the known and traditional diasporas in the world, the Republic created a non-state (parastate) organization that was entitled House of Immigrants of Macedonia.
297) calls it "public-private networks".(4) We think this concept to be more appropriate to characterize the Swiss way of policy making, as it indeed focuses on the strong cooperation between parastate organizations and the state.
Their accusations, from time to time, talk about a parastate (or unofficial policy) with exploitation of foreigners, official violence, employers that ill treat their workers, and the connivance of employers with state services (i.e., Department for Foreigners) to exploit and manipulate workers, psychological and sexual harassment, and other treatment unbefitting of Cypriot society (Foreigners; Support Movement, 2000a; 2000b).
If, on the other hand, his commitment was to the Serbian national cause, what explains his total abandonment of Croatia's Serbs in 1995, when the lawless parastate he had supported was ethnically cleansed of Serb civilians by the Croatian Army's Operation Storm?