paratill

paratill

[′par·ə‚til]
(geology)
A till formed by ice-rafting in a marine or lacustrine environment; includes deposits from ice floes and icebergs.
References in periodicals archive ?
A six-legged paratill was used (to a depth of 40 cm) to alleviate subsoil compaction in all plots.
The non-significant, numerical increase in soil loss due to paratilling from no-till plots with and without was caused by paratill disturbance.
2] (a) NT = no surface tillage; CT=conventional-till; R=residue; P = paratill.
The problem of undisturbed subsoil in the row middle for double crop, no surface tillage production of winter wheat was successfully addressed with a paratill with shanks set as opposed pairs and spaced 71 cm apart (Frederick and Bauer, 1996).
It is unknown how combining paratill subsoil disruption with narrow rows affects crop yield on Coastal Plain soils with relatively high organic matter.
Recompaction was slower than expected probably because of controlled traffic or excessive disruption by the paratill.
After disking in the spring, the soybean plots having the 19-cm-row width assigned to be deep tilled were deep tilled to a depth of 41 cm (top of B soil horizon) with a four-shanked ParaTill (Bigham Brothers, Inc.
In contrast, with the 19-cm soybean row width system, the soil was deep tilled with a Paratill which loosens almost all the soil located between the tillage shanks (Busscher et al.
We were also nor told why the shank spacing and depth of operation with the paratill and subsoil tillage implement were nor the same.
Treatments were all combinations of surface tillage (disked or no surface tillage), spring deep tillage (deep tilled or no deep tillage before soybean planting), row width culture (production practices for row widths of 76 or 19 cm), and fall deep tillage (deep tilled with a four-shanked ParaTill prior to wheat planting or no deep tillage).
Deep rip and paratill tillage treatments were established on an Ultic Argixeroll under a winter wheat (Triticum aestivum)/spring pea (Pisum sativum) rotation.
Keywords: Deep rip, infiltration rate, Palouse, paratill, water erosion