parautochthonous

parautochthonous

[¦par·ə·ȯ′täk·thə·nəs]
(geology)
Pertaining to a mobilized part of an autochthonous granite moved higher in the crust or into a tectonic area of lower pressure and characterized by variable and diffuse contacts with country rocks.
(petrology)
Pertaining to a rock that is intermediate in tectonic character between autochthonous and allochthonous.
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References in periodicals archive ?
From a palaeoecological point of view, they probably correspond to demic organisms, dwellers of relatively deep environments and autochthonous or parautochthonous taphonomic elements (sensu Fernandez Lopez, 1990; 1991), deposited during periods of reduced sedimentation in a low-energy environment.
Valves are rarely found in their life position and appear as parautochthonous associations (transported slightly in the vicinity of their habitats (Seeling and Bengtson, 1999).
Howard and Offield 1968; Robertson 1968; Roddy 1968; Wilson and Stearns 1968] have demonstrated that parautochthonous bedrock exposures of shatter cones are confined to the central uplift of complex craters.
The application of size-frequency distribution and energy flow in paleoecologic analysis: an example using parautochthonous death assemblages from a variable salinity bay.
A more recent view is that the granite massifs are parautochthonous, i.
Lower Plate-Hosted Gold Mineralization: Gold mineralization hosted by autochthonous or parautochthonous Ordovician to Devonian lower plate sedimentary rocks would be similar to Jerritt Canyon and other large Carlin-type gold deposits.
In this case valves are rarely found in their life position and appear as parautochthonous associations (transported slightly in the vicinity of their habitats (Seeling and Bengtson 1999).
This implies that both parautochthonous and allochthonous elements (sensu FernAndez Lopez, 2000) are probably mixed together in the fossil association of Lano; palaeoecologically, there are demic elements, consisting of aquatic (bony fish, amphibians) or semi-aquatic elements (crocodyliforms, chelonians) and also ademic, terrestrial ones (solemydid turtles, dinosaurs, mammals).
In an important paper, Wnuk and Pfefferkorn (1984) described parautochthonous assemblages of medullosan pteridosperms from Pennsylvania, USA.
A marginal parautochthonous belt in the northwest can be readily linked with the adjacent foreland, despite the effects of Grenvillian metamorphism and polyphase deformation (Fig.
2007): The parautochthonous Gondwanan origin of the Cuyania (greater Precordillera) terrane of Argentine: A re-evaluation of evidence used to support an allochthonous Laurentia origin.