parcel

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parcel

1. a quantity of some commodity offered for sale; lot
2. a distinct portion of land

Parcel

A piece of land with its own metes and bounds.

parcel

Of land, a contiguous land area which is considered as a unit, which is subject to a single ownership, and which is legally recorded as a single piece.

parcel

As used in meteorology, it means a small volume of air—small enough to contain a uniform distribution of its meteorological properties and large enough to remain relatively self-contained and respond to all external factors.
References in classic literature ?
Wragge hesitated, sighed penitently, considered a little, stretched out her hand timidly toward one of the parcels, thought of the supernatural warning, and shrank back from her own purchases with a desperate exertion of self-control.
Wragge turned round -- dropped a third parcel -- and, forgetting it in her astonishment, ascended the second flight of stairs.
Wragge walked into the room -- looked all over it -- saw nobody -- and indicated her astonishment at the result by dropping a fourth parcel, and trembling helplessly from head to foot.
Wragge, falling headlong into the snare, and darting at the parcel as eagerly as if nothing had happened.
"Parcel?" repeated Valentin; and it was his turn to look inquiring.
"I mean the parcel the gentleman left--the clergyman gentleman."
But a second after, one of them runs back into the shop and says, `Have I left a parcel!' Well, I looked everywhere and couldn't see one; so he says, `Never mind; but if it should turn up, please post it to this address,' and he left me the address and a shilling for my trouble.
I had the sense to make a duplicate of the right parcel, and now, my friend, you've got the duplicate and I've got the jewels.
"I went back to that sweet-shop and asked if I'd left a parcel, and gave them a particular address if it turned up.
Flambeau tore a brown-paper parcel out of his inner pocket and rent it in pieces.
The Carrier had some faint idea of adding, 'dote upon you.' But, happening to meet the half-closed eye, as it twinkled upon him over the turned-up collar of the cape, which was within an ace of poking it out, he felt it such an unlikely part and parcel of anything to be doted on, that he substituted, 'that she don't believe it?'