parenteral

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parenteral

[pər′ent·ə·rəl]
(medicine)
Outside the intestine; not via the alimentary tract.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The MEA Parenteral Nutrition Market is expected to display a CAGR of 7.1% in the forthcoming period owing to variables such as increase in premature births, vulnerability to malnutrition, and increasing prevalence of cancers.
Baxter provides a broad portfolio of essential renal and hospital products, including home, acute and in-center dialysis; sterile IV solutions; infusion systems and devices; parenteral nutrition; surgery products and anesthetics; and pharmacy automation, software and services.
Total parenteral nutrition has multiple indications.
Cadnapaphornchai, "Infection and cholestasis in neonates with intestinal resection and long-term parenteral nutrition," Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, vol.
In a phase III study of 86 adults with SBS, 63% of those treated with 0.05 mg/kg daily had at least a 20% reduction in the volume of parenteral nutrition and IV fluids required after 24 weeks of treatment, compared with 30% of those on placebo.
There were significant differences between groups for total parenteral nutrition, and they were highly significant when amino acids and intralipids were used together.
The results of the present study indicate that the addition of L-glutamine to parenteral nutrition decreased the number of infections and possibly decreased mortality, when compared with standard parenteral nutrition, in patients with severe acute pancreatitis.
According to the multivariate analysis, previous infections (38.2% were bacteremias) (odds ratio [OR] = 4.2) and parenteral nutrition (OR = 27.8) were associated with Leuconostoc spp.
When oral or enteral nutrition cannot meet a patient's needs, parenteral nutrition (PN) support may be indicated.
In New York State, for example, trained LPNs can put in IV needles, but they are not allowed to perform total parenteral nutrition (TPN).