parentheses


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parentheses

Parentheses ( ( ) ) are used to separate information that is not necessary to the structure or meaning of the surrounding text.
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parentheses

parenthesis

The left parenthesis "(" and right parenthesis ")" are used to delineate one expression from another. For example, in the query list for size="34" and (color = "red" or color ="green"), parentheses group the ORs together so they are a distinct entity from the AND.

In programming, parentheses are used to surround input parameters of a function call. For example, in C, the string compare statement strnicmp (itemA, itemB, 10) uses parentheses to group the ITEMA, ITEMB and 10 values handed over to the function.
References in periodicals archive ?
But what of the second and third pairs of parentheses in the poem's penultimate stanza?
The first efficient implementation of balanced string of k multiple types of parentheses and bitmaps for several queries have been proposed in [CGW + 98, CLL01, MR01] whenever k = O(1).
Parentheses are used to set off words and phrases that explain or refer to something within the main sentence.
The number of possible ways to insert parentheses grows exponentially with the number of letters in the exponential tower, following the sequence 1, 1, 2, 5, 14, 43, 132,...
As obtrusive as parentheses can be in narratives, they are even worse in direct quotations.
In particular, is there an accepted practice for the use of emoticons that includes an opening or closing parenthesis as the final token within a set of parentheses? Should I incorporate the emoticon into the closing of the parentheses (giving a dual purpose to the closing parenthesis, such as in this case :-); simply leave the emoticon up against the closing parenthesis, ignoring the bizarre visual effect of the doubled closing parenthesis (as I am doing here, producing a double-chin effect :-)); or avoid the situation by using a different emoticon (some emoticons are similar :-D), placing the emoticon elsewhere, or doing without it (i.e., reword to avoid awkwardness)?
Metronome markings also are included, and I applaud me decision to put them in parentheses, since modern interpretations of these standards often vary widely in tempo.
But for those who cheer the precision of the properly placed parentheses, the diversion of a dash or just the utilitarian commonness of the comma, give up an exclamation point: August 22 is National Punctuation Day.
Posted in bold black is "Why do some men ..." followed in much smaller, red type in parentheses "(Open and be surprised!)."
The musical parentheses of jaunty sea chanteys at the beginning and end of each disk contribute not only a sense of continuity, but also lend a realistic old New England seacoast flavor to the tale.
Truss gives easy to understand instructions as to where and when and how to use such wonderful marks as apostrophes, commas, dashes, colons, semicolons, exclamation marks, ellipses, parentheses, brackets, and more.
When Internet survey firm iBridge asked company employees in their 20s what a job transfer entails, the reply by 29.3 percent was "demotion," followed in descending order (with percentages in parentheses), by success (13.0), a chance to turn over a new leaf (12.3), opportunity (7.0), stress (6.3), anxiety (5.3), having to change one's abode (4.3), being set up for layoff (4.0), madogiwa ("being seated by the window," meaning to be shunted off to an irrelevant, do-nothing position) and promotion to a higher post (3.0).