parietal lobe


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parietal lobe

[pə′rī·əd·əl ‚lōb]
(anatomy)
The cerebral lobe of the brain above the lateral cerebral sulcus and behind the central sulcus.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is anticipated that the use of a spatial/holistic MR strategy will be reflected in extensive EEG activation over the right hemisphere, especially over the parietal lobes, while a verbal/analytic MR strategy will be reflected in strong activation over the left hemisphere, especially over the left frontal and temporal areas.
MIH Degree of Posterior prosencephalon frontal and non-separation parietal lobe fusion.
1) found hyperdense signal changes in the T2A series in bilateral occipitallobes in 14 patients, in the posterior parietal lobes in 13 patients, in the posterior temporal lobes in 9 patients, in the pons in 2 patients and in the thalamus and cerebellum in one patient in their study which included 15 patients diagnosed with PLES.
Learning lines is one thing, but knowing first-hand the difference between a parietal lobe and an ear lobe is another, and Nesbitt oversaw several operations to give him a better insight into the role.
Imaging studies revealed a lobulated, ring-enhancing lesion with surrounding edema in the left parietal lobe (Figure 1).
First, activity increased in the parietal lobe and the premotor cortex, parts of the brain's mirror neuron system.
A Carnegie Mellon University study found that simply listening to somebody speaking on a phone caused a 37 per cent drop in activity in the brain's parietal lobe, where spatial tasks are managed.
Archibald and colleagues (2001) observed gray- and white-matter volume reductions in the parietal lobes of children with FAS, and a study of children with FASD reported that the left parietal lobe had increased gray matter and decreased white matter (Sowell et al.
The white matter of the parietal lobe was sampled, because this region is thought to be relevant for processing speed and aspects of attention.
1-5) Vision is perhaps one of the most complex activities that our brain conducts, being represented in every major area of the brain as well as the midbrain and brainstem; (6) the frontal lobe caters for eye movement planning, (7) the temporal lobe for recognition of people, places, faces (8) and motion, (9) and the parietal lobe provides our visuo-spatial map (10) (Figure 1).
Arryah was diagnosed with parietal lobe dysfunction, which affects his sight, around two years ago.