lobule

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lobule

[′läb·yül]
(biology)
A small lobe.
A division of a lobe.
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, peak voxel activations were found in the left inferior parietal lobule (Brodmann Area 40), as well as the superior portion of the right middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann Area 8) for this contrast.
[sup.11]C-pPIB: ([sup.11]C)-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B; AD: Alzheimer's disease; CN: cognitively normal; ITG: inferior temporal cortex; STG: superior temporal gyrus; BA: Brodmann area; ACC: anterior cingulate cortex; SPL: superior parietal lobe; IPL: inferior parietal lobule.
In this study, regression analysis of group asymmetry indices demonstrated a more pronounced decreasing trend from baseline to follow-up visits in MCI converters, compared with nonconverters, in the language-related and memory-related cortical regions, including the banks of the superior temporal sulcus, caudal middle frontal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, pars triangularis, entorhinal cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus.
In addition, we found that some areas such as the superior parietal lobule displayed even shorter latencies.
Moreover, involuntary processing such as salience detection, interoception, and conflict monitoring and resolution, and involuntary attention is automatic and involves the brain areas, including the bilateral insula cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, ventromedial prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, and inferior parietal lobule [25-28].
In the ROI-to-ROI analysis, correlations between the AIPS (seed region) and the middle frontal gyrus, the visual cortex, the superior parietal lobule, and the premotor cortex all in the left hemisphere of the brain showed decrement in connectivity in the patient group compared to controls.
IFG: inferior frontal gyrus; IPL: inferior parietal lobule; aMCC: anterior midcingulate cortex; pgACC: pregenual anterior cingulate cortex; OFC: orbitofrontal cortex.
Axial MR images demonstrate a T1 hypointense, T2 FLAIR hyperintense mass-like intra-axial confluence centered within the right posterior frontal lobe and right superior parietal lobule with surrounding mass effect and minimal resulting right to left midline shift (Figures 2 and 3).
Five clusters were found with increased brain activation in CRT patients from pre- to post-training, compared with non-CRT patients [Table 3] and [Figure 3],[sup][15],[24],[25],[26],[27],[31] (1) the right middle frontal gyrus (568 mm [sup]3, BA6); (2) the right postcentral gyrus (552 mm [sup]3, BA2); (3) the left medial frontal gyrus (440 mm [sup]3, BA6); (4) the right inferior parietal lobule (280 mm [sup]3, BA40); (5) the left middle frontal gyrus (208 mm [sup]3, BA9).{Table 3}{Figure 3}
Consistent with this, studies confirm that the critical region mediating hemispatial neglect is the territory of the middle cerebral artery; specifically the angular gyrus on the lateral surface of the inferior parietal lobule (IPL).
Earlier studies [23] using the statistical parametric mapping (SPM) software for data analysis found that compared to the cerebellum (the reference), patients with OCD showed changes in blood flow in the precuneus, left superior temporal gyrus, right superior gyri orbitales, bilateral superior frontal gyrus, and left superior parietal lobule; when compared to the whole brain region, these patients showed changes in blood perfusion in the bilateral precuneus, right cuneus, right temporal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, bilateral superior fontal gyrus, superior gyri orbitales, left superior parietal lobule, left frontal cingulate, bilateral putamina, right angular gyrus, and right cerebellum.
Davison et al., "Greater superior than inferior parietal lobule activation with increasing rotation angle during mental rotation: an fMRI study," Neuropsychologia, vol.