Parlance


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Parlance

A concurrent language.

["Parallel Processing Structures: Languages, Schedules, and Performance Results", P.F. Reynolds, PhD Thesis, UT Austin 1979].
References in classic literature ?
I won't say in American parlance that suddenly the bottom fell out of the whole of de Barral concerns.
The Doctor again assumed his air of resolution, and, without further parlance, proceeded to do as desired.
And if ever there were an unfeeling handsome chin that looked as if, for certain, it had never been, in familiar parlance,
These dynamics are cited by Parlance Corporation in a new study released today that examines the call handling practices of leading companies in the U.
For more information, contact: Mark Bedard, Director of Marketing PARLANCE CORPORATION 400 W.
Proper Yorkie VVEXPLOSIVE finish Loved reading Steve Palmer's struggle to fathom out the sport's parlance in his Racing Education series.
Chas & Dave @ Grand Theatre, Swansea (Friday) [bar] CHAS Hodges and Dave Peacock have, in their own Cockney parlance, had "a right old bubble" during their long, illustrious career.
To adopt footballing parlance, credit is due to all at Newcastle United for an impressive return to the top flight, particularly to Chris Hughton who has steered a remarkably steady-handed course back to the top.
McLeish, who had Davies as a player at Motherwell, described him as a 'nippy sweetie' - in Scots' parlance an irritant.
But in the parlance of Match Of The Day, The Cribs boys played a blinder with their new signing, Johnny Marr.
society, many terms and expressions invented by prisoners eventually entered into non-criminal parlance, especially in dialects of the lower classes.
Make no mistake: The defeat of Republicans from across the country was a flat repudiation -- a smackdown in the parlance of the pro-wrestling set -- of President George W.