Paronomasia

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Paronomasia

 

a figure of speech in which paronyms are set in opposition to produce a comic effect or suggest a figurative meaning. Paronyms are words whose similarity in sound or partial coincidence in morphemic composition may cause errors in usage or, more frequently, give rise to puns. Examples of paronomasia are the Russian muzh po drova, zhena so dvora (“when the husband leaves to get the firewood, the wife gets to leave the house”) and the French apprendre n’est pas comprendre (“studying is not the same as learning”).

References in periodicals archive ?
The fourth chapter of the book briefly describes the use of infinitives absolute in non-modal contexts, and draws an important distinction between the effect of the paronomastic infinitive in modal versus non-modal contexts: whereas in modal contexts the paronomastic construction emphasizes modality, in non-modal contexts it serves as "adverbial intensification of the verbal idea" (p.
The type c paronomastic infinitive (Cohen 2004: [section]3) is used like the asseverative, for insistence, as well as for rhetorical concessives (which is what we have here; see Cohen 2005a: 60-65).
Veiling--in this case, of male narrative agency--would promise to frame, contain and ultimately unveil more rigorously the female other, a gesture that reinforces the promise of linguistic mastery as well, since the epigraph in fact is structured precisely on a paronomastic pun on the words "bed" and "death" in Greek, thalamos and thanatos.
In the first two subtypes of the paronomastic infinitive in -um(-ma), the infinitive is a syntactic representation of the verbal lexeme.
Wiht could convey that inherent or paronomastic sense in a deliberate identification of two ultimately unrelated words, an identification that leads to wordplay, a verbal activity in which the Anglo-Saxon poets showed considerable skill, though I know of no example of play on these particular homonyms.(7) Merging of senses and wordplay would have to be argued for convincingly by a critic.
Again, the argument rests fundamentally on the assumption that poetic language must play by the same rules as non-poetic language; poetry, even paronomastic poetry, is not exempt from the ordinary requirements of sentential coherence.
This corresponds to the Han paronomastic glosses on fu [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]; see Knechtges, The Han Rhapsody, 12-13.
The answer to (b), then, is suggested by the Hann-time paronomastic gloss [CHINESE TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]: 'thief' means '[one who] flees', or 'an absconder' is '[one who] absconds'.(20) The import of this definition is morphological: the verb taur < *law 'to flee, abscond' has the "concretizing" suffix -s added to it to produce a corresponding noun, daw < *laws 'one who flees, absconds' > 'thief'.(21) At the time of the GD manuscripts the derivational nature of the word daw < *laws 'one who flees, absconds' > 'thief' may have still been recognized, and so a character graphically related to the verb taur [CHINESE TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] seemed natural and was used.
The user of this volume will also be less than well served by W's desultory introduction to the historicallinguistic problems presented by the SWCTs punning definitions, many (or most) of which may be read as paronomastic etymologies.
80, Makeham discusses the paronomastic glossing of li with ti and lu; in the note he states: "It is interesting in that the relation of ti and li is based on graphic similarities while that of lu and li is based on phonetic similarities." This might seem a little less odd if it were pointed out that and are both rime, shang sheng, and both may even now be pronounced li (third tone).
They commonly went through a stage called "graphic multivalence," where graphs could represent homophones (rebus writing or paronomastic writing) as well as homeosemes (parasemantic use of a graph).
When one examines the numerous definitions of li listed in the Jingji zuangu the semantic link between dao and li becomes clear.(29) The word li [is less than] *lidx is glossed as lu [is less than] *ljidx in a number of early texts, including the Shuowen jiezi.(30) Although the use of lu to define li, a word belonging to the same rhyme group, may be dismissed as a contrived paronomastic gloss, the word lu is in turn glossed in the Shuowen jiezi as zu suo yi ye 'that which the feet follow [i.e., a path]'(31) and it occurs in the Book of Odes with the meaning 'path'.