parotitis


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Related to parotitis: mumps

parotitis

[‚par·ə′tīd·əs]
(medicine)
Inflammation of the parotid glands.
References in periodicals archive ?
of Cases Pleomorphic Adenoma 16 Chronic Sialadenitis 6 Warthin's Tumour 2 Parotitis 3 Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma 4 Acinic Cell Carcinoma 4 Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma 5
Only one patient required antibiotic treatment, for a secondary bacterial parotitis with purulent discharge from the papilla of Stensen's duct.
Information about persons with lab-confirmed influenza who are diagnosed with parotitis is needed to understand the occurrence of parotitis during the 2014-15 influenza season and further explore characteristics of such cases.
Smooching can lead to 'hot kissing disease' an infection passed through saliva which can lead to pulmonary tuberculosis, colds, parotitis, scarlet fever, syphilis and nettle rash.
Xerostomia can increase the risk for caries, periodontal disease, and oral infections such as candidiasis, glossitis, stomatitis, and parotitis.
Salmonella parotitis with abscess formation in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection.
The clinical manifestations of HIV infection in infants and children are varied and include lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, failure to thrive, oral candidiasis, chronic parotitis, chronic cough, generalized dermatitis, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, recurrent bacterial infections, and wasting syndrome.
Mumps is an acute, viral illness that classically is manifested as parotitis and can cause severe complications, including encephalitis (1), deafness (2,3), and orchitis (4).
43) Intraparotid lesions can also present with parotitis.
Angioedema, acute allergic reaction, and parotitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis, (2) but in our case, the IgE levels and amylase levels were normal, and the patient's history and physical examination revealed no correlation with these disorders.
These include arbovirus or arthropod-borne viruses, bartonellosis, brucellosis, cholera, dengue, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, enthomology, yellow fever, philariasis, hepatitis, retrovirus, syphilis, toxoplasmosis, influenza, vaccine-preventable diseases, leishmaniasis, malaria, mycoses, human papillomavirus, paragonimosis, intestinal parasites, parotitis, rabies, rubella, typhus, toxoplasmosis, trypanosomiaisis, and tuberculosis.