psittacosis

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Related to parrot fever: ornithosis, parrot disease

psittacosis

psittacosis (sĭtəkōˈsĭs) or parrot fever, infectious disease caused by the species of Chlamydia psittaci and transmitted to people by birds, particularly parrots, parakeets, and lovebirds. In birds the disease takes the form of an intestinal infection, but in people the illness runs the course of a virus pneumonia; infection follows inhalation of dust from feathers or cage contents or the bite of an infected bird. Human psittacosis, which can be transmitted to others by cough droplets and sputum, is treated the same as pneumonia. The mortality rate may run as high as 30%. Restrictions on bird importation and attention to infected flocks of pigeons have been used to control the disease. Treatment with tetracycline antibiotic is usually effective.
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psittacosis

[‚sid·ə′kō·səs]
(medicine)
Pneumonia and generalized infection of man and of birds caused by agents of the PLT-Bedsonia group; transmitted to humans by psittacine birds.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

psittacosis

a disease of parrots, caused by the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia psittaci, that can be transmitted to man, in whom it produces inflammation of the lungs and pneumonia
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Another potential pathogen sometimes found in bird (but not bat) droppings is a bacterium called Chlamydophila psittaci (formerly Chlamydia psittaci), the causal agent of psittacosis, or parrot fever.
According to the officials at Matsue Vogel Park, five female employees who were taking care of birds were hospitalized after complaining of symptoms consistent with pneumonia in December, and four of them were diagnosed with psittacosis, also known as parrot fever or ornithosis.
THE first of the four victims of "parrot fever" was a GP, it has been revealed.