particular


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particular

1. (of the solution of a differential equation) obtained by giving specific values to the arbitrary constants in a general equation
2. Logic (of a proposition) affirming or denying something about only some members of a class of objects, as in some men are not wicked
3. Property law denoting an estate that precedes the passing of the property into ultimate ownership
4. Logic another name for individual
5. Philosophy an individual object, as contrasted with a universal

Particular

 

singular, individual, the philosophical cate-gory expressing the relative isolation, discreteness, and spatial and temporal distinctness of things and events and the specific individual properties constituting their unique qualitative and quantitative determinateness.

Not only individual objects but whole classes of objects as well can be regarded as particulars if they are considered as unified, relatively independent, and existing within the limits of a certain measure. In addition, the object itself is a set of individual parts. Things and events are absolutely nonidentical, individual. They occupy different places, have different relations, and consequently possess different properties. Events cannot be repeated. Phenomena are subject to the principle of the irreversibility of time. The “repeated” is already characterized by its occurrence at a different time and thus under new conditions, which leave their stamp on the phenomenon.

The concrete form that an individual object takes is determined by a system of relationships out of which the object emerges. “The individual exists only in the connection that leads to the universal…. Every individual enters incompletely into the universal, etc., etc.” (V. I. Lenin, Poln. sobr. soch., 5th ed., vol. 29, p. 318). The universal is disclosed in its concept only through the reflection of the individual and particular. As early as Aristotle it was noted that the universal exists only in relation to the particular. Science is interested above all in the lawlike and the universal, which it reaches through the particular. Art and other spheres of human activity achieve the universal in the form of the particular.

A. G. SPIRKIN

References in periodicals archive ?
A number of other essays go significantly beyond putting a particular document in context and discuss significant issues about the formation of identity.
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The contents are of particular interest to young adolescents and their teachers.
In the particular case mentioned earlier, the group ended up discussing whether or not one can effectively collaborate with a person whose face you do not know--and frankly it was not much of a discussion.
Their different styles and theological emphases have both guided the congregation and reflected where the congregation stood at a particular time.
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The sections on clinical management of particular conditions are relatively sparse, and healthcare workers with patients with active problems should consult with a more comprehensive text.
said that "it would not have been reasonable to simply say that the computation of 'Resource Allowance' or 'resource profits' was in issue, without specifying the particular elements of that computation that required a determination by the Minister or the Tax Court [.
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As Kastan demonstrates, the Acts and Monuments as it came to exist in the "English imagination" is not one book; "rather, it is several different books, each reflecting the particular interests of its editors, redactors, abridgers, and publishers every bit as much as they reflect Foxe's own concerns" (129).