partridge


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Related to partridge: grouse

partridge,

common name applied to various henlike birds of several families. The true partridges of the Old World are members of the pheasant family (Phasianidae); the common European or Hungarian species has been successfully introduced in parts of North America. In some areas of the United States the name partridge is applied to the ruffed grousegrouse,
common name for a game bird of the colder parts of the Northern Hemisphere. There are about 18 species. Grouse are henlike terrestrial birds, protectively plumaged in shades of red, brown, and gray.
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, the bobwhitebobwhite,
common name for an American henlike bird of the family Phasianidae, which also includes the pheasant and the partridge. The eastern bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) is about 10 in. (25 cm) long.
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, and the plumed quailquail,
common name for a variety of small game birds related to the partridge, pheasant, and more distantly to the grouse. There are three subfamilies in the quail family: the New World quails; the Old World quails and partridges; and the true pheasants and seafowls.
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; in Europe the South American tinamou is called a partridge. The gray partridge, Perdix perdix, is an Old World bird of about 1 to 1 1-2 ft (30–45 cm). True partridges are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Galliformes, family Phasianidae.

partridge

[′pär·trij]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of the game birds comprising the genera Alectoris and Perdix in the family Phasianidae.

partridge

1. any of various small Old World gallinaceous game birds of the genera Perdix, Alectoris, etc., esp P. perdix (common or European partridge): family Phasianidae (pheasants)
2. US and Canadian any of various other gallinaceous birds, esp the bobwhite and ruffed grouse
References in classic literature ?
Because the partridge lying dead over there is my partridge.
The bluejay put on his topcoat and was going to the partridge for law when he met the partridge coming to him.
FELIX:--"What made you call it The Battle of the Partridge Eggs when the bluejay had just as much to do with it?
d'Orbigny, which can only be called a partridge with regard to its habits.
Set out for Buenos Ayres -- Rio Sauce -- Sierra Ventana -- Third Posta -- Driving Horses -- Bolas -- Partridges and Foxes -- Features of the Country -- Long-legged Plover -- Teru-tero -- Hail-storm -- Natural Enclosures in the Sierra Tapalguen -- Flesh of Puma -- Meat Diet -- Guardia del Monte -- Effects of Cattle on the Vegetation -- Cardoon -- Buenos Ayres -- Corral where Cattle are Slaughtered.
As this point was the most exposed on the whole line, twenty-one soldiers were stationed here; at sunset they returned from hunting, bringing with them seven deer, three ostriches, and many armadilloes and partridges.
Numbers of smaller birds, as ducks, hawks, and partridges, were killed.
All day the sun has shone on the surface of some savage swamp, where the single spruce stands hung with usnea lichens, and small hawks circulate above, and the chickadee lisps amid the evergreens, and the partridge and rabbit skulk beneath; but now a more dismal and fitting day dawns, and a different race of creatures awakes to express the meaning of Nature there.
Commit a crime, and it seems as if a coat of snow fell on the ground, such as reveals in the woods the track of every partridge and fox and squirrel and mole.
Nay, she had been treated with uncommon kindness, and her mistress had permitted Mr Partridge to give her those instructions which have been before commemorated.
Thus it happened to Mrs Partridge, who had submitted four years to her husband's teaching this young woman, and had suffered her often to neglect her work, in order to pursue her learning.
Mr Partridge had profited too much by experience to interpose in a matter of this nature.