judge

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judge

a leader of the peoples of Israel from Joshua's death to the accession of Saul
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

What does it mean when you dream about a judge?

A judge may represent an authority figure—in real life or in the dreamer’s psyche—who constantly condemns or criticizes spontaneous actions that are considered to be unruly and frivolous. A dream in which one feels guilty about committing a wrong may indicate a subconscious need to condemn one’s actions—self-judgment. Alternatively, judges may represent justice or good/bad judgment. (See also Court).

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ahsan believes that LSA's impartiality is a good thing: "And we should applaud the fact that Lux Style Awards did not take it upon itself to pass judgement on a sub judice matter.
"Meaningless colloquialisms, lack of capital letters and a total absence of full stops indicate someone who is not fit to pass judgement on a goldfish."
After hearing lengthy mitigation, Mr Justice Hamblen decided he will pass judgement on Monday.
ALAN Peter Cayetano is not one to pass judgement on his big sister, thus he will inhibit himself from hearings the ethics committee he heads will hold on a plagiarism complaint filed against Sen.
It's very easy to sit there and pass judgement on those who, er, sit there and pass judgement but I've got no time for those armchair chair umpires.
So now, any person would pass judgement on the bill and the government will succumb to all demands, that is not possible," he added.
Summary: Liverpool manager Kenny Dalglish has defended striker Andy Carroll saying no-one is in a position to pass judgement on his lifestyle.
The study, which does not pass judgement on the validity of European climate change objectives, concerns the search for a better match between these objectives and the economic instruments put in place to achieve them.
A new exhibition fuses these two opinions by showing art commissioned to pass judgement on the city.