passage


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passage

1
1. Music a section or division of a piece, movement, etc.
2. a section of a written work, speech, etc., esp one of moderate length
3. a journey, esp by ship
4. the enactment of a law or resolution by a legislative or deliberative body
5. an evacuation of the bowels

passage

2 Dressage
1. a sideways walk in which diagonal pairs of feet are lifted alternately
2. a cadenced lofty trot, the moment of suspension being clearly defined

Passage

Any interior corridor connecting room in a building; also called a hallway.

Passage

 

(microbiology), the successive transfer of cultures of microorganisms across various nutrient mediums or the reinoculation of one animal with pathogenic microbes from another, infected animal. A microorganism may undergo certain changes with repeated passage: it may lose its ability to form spores and its pigmentary activity may be altered, its fermentative activity may be decreased, and its virulence may be reduced. In order to prevent the possibly consequent alterations in the behavior of the microorganism, it is preferable to store collections of cultures in a lyophilized state or at the temperature of liquid nitrogen. (SeeLYOPHILIZATION.) In medical microbiology, microorganisms are sometimes passaged among several animals in order to increase the virulence of a culture.


Passage

 

in music, the term used since the 16th century for a rapid sequence of sounds, difficult to execute and characteristic of virtuoso music. There are several types: scale passages, arpeggio passages, and mixed passages.

passage

[′pas·ij]
(geography)
A navigable channel, especially one through reefs or islands.
(navigation)
A transit from one place to another; one leg of a voyage.

passageway, passage

A space connecting one area or room of a building with another.
References in classic literature ?
But even this would hardly explain the enormous omnipresence and widely distributed detail of "The Bruno Case," or "The Passage Mystery," in the Press of London and the provinces.
He had then distinctly heard the deceased, having sent the Captain on his errand, turn round laughing and run down the passage towards its other end, where was the prisoner's dressing-room.
Then the astonished eyes of the adventurers saw the great stone door revolve on its axis and swing to one side, leaving a passage open through which they could pass.
We sprang forward with desperate energy, and, standing in a bloody ooze, began to feel up and down the door and the sides of the passage.
And so he tumbled out into the passage, leaving them somewhat embarrassed, but not sorry that he knew what they had done.
But the real triumph was reserved for Christine Daae, who had begun by singing a few passages from Romeo and Juliet.
There was silence immediately--even among the people in the passages without, and on the other staircases, who could neither see nor hear, but to whom, notwithstanding, the signal was conveyed with marvellous rapidity.
Not so the writer of the "Iliad" from which the Odyssean passage is probably taken.
The mate went out of the passage in his little boat, and that was the end of him we made sure, for how could so small a boat, with four men in it, live on the ocean?
The first place to be met with in travelling along the coast of Africa is Rondelo, situate over against Toro, and celebrated for the same miraculous passage.
His room had no direct outlet on the passage, but let on one side into the glass office, and on the other into the cloak room beyond.
Perhaps it would be as well to start out with a broad and rapid sketch of Nietzsche as a writer on Morals, Evolution, and Sociology, so that the reader may be prepared to pick out for himself, so to speak, all passages in this work bearing in any way upon Nietzsche's views in those three important branches of knowledge.