passage

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passage

1
1. Music a section or division of a piece, movement, etc.
2. a section of a written work, speech, etc., esp one of moderate length
3. a journey, esp by ship
4. the enactment of a law or resolution by a legislative or deliberative body
5. an evacuation of the bowels

passage

2 Dressage
1. a sideways walk in which diagonal pairs of feet are lifted alternately
2. a cadenced lofty trot, the moment of suspension being clearly defined

Passage

Any interior corridor connecting room in a building; also called a hallway.

Passage

 

(microbiology), the successive transfer of cultures of microorganisms across various nutrient mediums or the reinoculation of one animal with pathogenic microbes from another, infected animal. A microorganism may undergo certain changes with repeated passage: it may lose its ability to form spores and its pigmentary activity may be altered, its fermentative activity may be decreased, and its virulence may be reduced. In order to prevent the possibly consequent alterations in the behavior of the microorganism, it is preferable to store collections of cultures in a lyophilized state or at the temperature of liquid nitrogen. (SeeLYOPHILIZATION.) In medical microbiology, microorganisms are sometimes passaged among several animals in order to increase the virulence of a culture.


Passage

 

in music, the term used since the 16th century for a rapid sequence of sounds, difficult to execute and characteristic of virtuoso music. There are several types: scale passages, arpeggio passages, and mixed passages.

passage

[′pas·ij]
(geography)
A navigable channel, especially one through reefs or islands.
(navigation)
A transit from one place to another; one leg of a voyage.

passageway, passage

A space connecting one area or room of a building with another.
References in classic literature ?
Late at night, as Magdalen passed the end of the second-floor passage, proceeding alone on her way up to her own room, she stopped and listened.
They were too quick to be caught; but Flashman was on the lookout, and sent an empty pickle-jar whizzing after them, which narrowly missed Tom's head, and broke into twenty pieces at the end of the passage.
When the passage was once more deserted, he crossed it, opened the door of the dressing-room, went in and shut the door.
With that, they stepped back again, keeping their faces towards the crowd; took each an arm of the misguided nobleman; drew him into the passage, and shut the door; which they directly locked and fastened on the inside.
Not so the writer of the "Iliad" from which the Odyssean passage is probably taken.
You see, colonel," he said, "I was shut up in that small room there doing some writing, when I heard a pair of feet in this passage doing a dance that was as queer as the dance of death.
As he did so, old Parkinson tottered in his wavering way out of the door and caught sight of the corpse lying in the passage.
He had remained behind them in the passage while they were trying to move the rock.
Our friends had no further trouble in reaching the end of the passage, and soon were standing in the outer air upon the gloomy path between the two high mountains.
Following the passage for about fifteen paces farther, we came suddenly to an elaborately painted wooden door.
Now, whether this passage were miraculous or not, the Israelites, nevertheless, crossed there to reach the Promised Land, and Pharaoh's army perished precisely on that spot; and I think that excavations made in the middle of the sand would bring to light a large number of arms and instruments of Egyptian origin.
You talk a great deal of the length of this passage, my dear.