Passing

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Passing

 

the maneuver in which a vehicle moves out of its lane of travel and overtakes one or more moving vehicles. According to statistics, violations of passing regulations cause approximately 5–6 percent of the traffic accidents in the USSR. Passing on a two-lane road with two-way traffic involves moving out into the lane for oncoming traffic and returning to the original lane. On one-way streets and roads passing is accomplished by moving onto a roadway designed specifically for traffic moving in only one direction and does not always involve a return to the original lane. As a general rule, one vehicle can pass another only on the left. If a vehicle is turning left, however, it can be overtaken only on the right. The Traffic Regulations include a list of the conditions under which passing is forbidden.

M. B. AFANAS’EV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Precisely what allows Clements to "know" his position to be right is itself a good question for Buddhist epistemology no less than Buddhist ethics.)Where the Buddhist prescriptions for action (such as those passingly noted in Part III above) present relatively commonsense adumbrations for wholesome (kusala) action that most could agree upon, it is not at all clear how they apply in cases such as this.
105].) Smith refers only passingly to studies showing that women apologize more often than men, but his limited discussions here should nevertheless inspire the already strong scholarly interest in the role of gender in transitional justice and peace-building.
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It is useful, I think, to view that process of reconfiguration as a performance, one more than passingly ostentatious, and which is itself thematized in the novel.
Third, the Commission observes that "some courts have effectively compensated for the lack of prejudgment interest by including in the determination of damages elements such as inflation and interest paid on borrowed capital." (91) It argues that changing the prejudgment interest rule "could deter courts from developing sounder rules regarding the treatment of opportunity and capital costs." (92) The argument that a bad rule should be retained in order to preserve an incentive for courts to invent ways around it is passingly odd.
And it is more than passingly strange that the PR firm that wrote the checks was owned by the founder of the Birmingham Times--the paper that published her highly favorable stories.
We learn of Ridley, for example, that 'he was passingly well learned, his memorie was great, and he of such reading withal, that of right he deserued to be comparable to the best of this our age' (Actes, p.
1, mentions the Beauchamp ex libris in some detail and refers passingly to the others: "Sur les gardes premiere et derniere on dechiffre (parfois assez malaisement) un certain nombre d'inscriptions accompagnees de noms propres: nous nous reservons d'en faire le sujet d'une etude que nous publierons a part." This promised essay has never been published.
Unlike these writers, Cummins does not hitch her plot to a sympathy that is passingly symbolic, psychologically expedient, or dipped in the gall of despair.
Everyone passingly familiar with Western culture knows (in the absence of strong contextual information to the contrary) that the Union Jack represents the United Kingdom, that a cross represents Christianity, and that a skull, skeleton, or the grim reaper represents death.
Anyone passingly familiar with ecclesiastical protocol and politics sees what's going on here.
Sizer only passingly mentions the darker side of the dispensationalist version of Zionism: the belief that the long history of antisemitic persecution, including the Holocaust, represents God's "chastisement" of his chosen but wayward people.