facilitated transport

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facilitated transport

[fə′sil· ə‚tād·əd ′trans‚pȯrt]
(physiology)
The transport of certain materials across a cell membrane, down a concentration gradient, assisted by enzymelike carrier proteins embedded in the membrane and without the explicit provision of energy.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Since the overexpression of drug efflux pumps is among the most common mechanisms responsible for the drug resistance in most of the fungi [6, 25], we checked if Ses is targeting MDR efflux transporter and passive diffusion in C.
In summary, knowledge transfer does not occur by passive diffusion but rather a complex dynamic process that can be cyclic or multidimensional.
acetic and formic acid) and N[O.sub.2] concentrations were measured by passive diffusion gas samplers (Ferm 1991) from the Norwegian Institute for Air Research.
Evalution of method of preparation of passive diffusion tubes for measurement of ambient nitrogen dioxide, Journal of Environmental Monitoring 6: 12-17.
B12 is absorbed by the GI tract in two ways through active transport and passive diffusion. A healthy digestive system will rely mainly on active transport as the body's primary means of obtaining B12 from dietary sources.
Using the placenta as our organ of interest, we have identified how stereology can be applied to quantify relevant processes (including villous growth and maturation, trophoblast turnover, fetoplacental angiogenesis and passive diffusion) and to test whether or not they are compromised in various complicated pregnancies.
Small ions adapt to this situation by passive diffusion aiming at a balanced situation in which products of paired ions' concentrations (one anion and one cation) are equal on both membrane sides, under the condition that further water movement is prevented by the fixed volume of neighboring fluid departments.
The most common mechanism of drug release from cryogels is passive diffusion, but the mechanism of release from cryogels can be classified in: diffusion-controlled, swelling-controlled and chemically-controlled.
Also the presence of the drug mostly in its dissociated form at physiological pH further limits its capacity for passive diffusion. Hence various techniques have been employed for enhancing the dermal delivery of MTX.
It is known that molality of creatinine in erythrocyte fluid is equal to molality in plasma (2) and that creatinine is transported by passive diffusion through the lipid bilayer of the erythrocyte membrane (3).
Magnesium is primarily absorbed in the proximal small bowel via passive diffusion and excess magnesium is efficiently eliminated in the urine.

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