passive element

passive element

[′pas·iv ′el·ə·mənt]
(electricity)
An element of an electric circuit that is not a source of energy, such as a resistor, inductor, or capacitor. Also known as passive component.
(electromagnetism)
References in periodicals archive ?
It requires three additional passive element. It adds the amount and mass of converter.
Therefore, the idea was to use the gear pump (29.1) as a main component while gear pump (29.2) acts as a passive element. Calculation for passive parallel connection can be done by Poisson distribution:
Most of sinusoidal oscillator designs required the following features: low THD of the quadrature sinusoidal output, independent control of frequency of oscillation (FO) and condition of oscillation (CO) [3], using minimum number of active and passive element [4], electronic controllability [5] and so on.
By employing DD-DXCCII a new voltage mode tunable resistorless all-pass filter using single passive element is realized.
The memristor was originally theorized in 1971 by circuit theorists as the "fourth passive element" following resistors, capacitors and inductors.
In that regard, social media is a passive element," the BMD statement read, elaborating on the benefits of social media, including its ability to create a path for citizens to seek their rights.
Given a base B [member of] M, the element e [member of] B is an externally passive element only if [phi](e) is an element of [EP.sub.M]([phi](B)).
In the latter, "man is the passive element upon whom God acts ...
Another limitation of traditional thin film approaches is that until recently, the only additional passive element that could be cost effectively integrated on thin film was a resistor.
This is a single passive element in its own leaded or surface-mount package.
Whereas his youthwork, the Speeches on Religion, had emphasized the passive element in religion, the soul dissolved in a union with the universe, his later theology gives significant place to the active, ethical expression of the faith: in addition to being person-forming, faith is now seen to be community-forming, nation-forming, (human) race-forming, and even world-forming.

Full browser ?