passive immunity

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Related to passive immunization: immunized, Active immunization

passive immunity

[′pas·iv i′myün·əd·ē]
(immunology)
Immunity acquired by injection of antibodies in another individual or in an animal.
Immunity acquired by the fetus by the transfer of maternal antibodies through the placenta.
References in periodicals archive ?
Passive immunization of the vagina protects mice against vaginal transmission of genital herpes infections.
Passive immunization of hamsters against disease caused by Clostridium difficile by use of bovine immunoglobulin G concentrate.
Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies against Porphyromonas gingivalis in patients with periodontitis.
To increase the level of protective antibody titers ([greater than or equal to]10 IU/L), both active and passive immunization are required.
For children at high risk for severe RSV infection, passive immunization with palivizumab (Synagis) and early aggressive management when they do become infected with RSV should reduce morbidity and mortality.
We report the results of studies evaluating the efficacy of the killed veterinary vaccine, a live attenuated chimeric virus candidate, and passive immunization with immune serum for preventing WNV encephalitis in a hamster model of the disease (5,6).
The immune serum used in passive immunization experiments was prepared by pooling convalescent-phase serum samples of six hamsters that were bled 5 weeks after infection with WNV strain NY385-99.
The potential for passive immunization against influenza has been evident since the Spanish influenza pandemic nearly a century ago, where the benefits of transfused blood reduced the risk of mortality by more than 50 percent.
Most importantly, administration off vaccinia immune globulin to persons in close contact with smallpox patients substantially reduced the incidence of disease compared with rates in exposed persons who did not receive passive immunization (46).
The need for intravenous administration is a severe constraint for mass passive immunization and would likely limit this practice to a few recipients.
Origen intends to use these methods to discover and produce human antibodies that could be used therapeutically for passive immunization, the process of fighting disease with ready-made antibodies.
Post exposure prophylaxis for severe bites requires both active immunization, using vaccines such as those currently marketed by sanofi pasteur, and passive immunization in the form of rabies immunoglobulins (RIG).