passive smoking

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Related to passive smoke: Environmental Tobacco Smoke

passive smoking

the inhalation of smoke from other people's cigarettes by a nonsmoker
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Overall, 196(63.84%) were currently exposed to passive smoke either at home or at workplace or both.
Cigarette smoking and exposure to passive smoke are risk factors for cervical cancer.
Smokers should respect non-smoker's wishes when they don't wish to passive smoke.
Table 6 shows that 59.8% of participants who receive education about passive smoke hazards have been exposed to passive smoke, in comparison to 41.9 % among those who did not receive health education (p=0.002).
Gender differences existed, with women being exposed to passive smoke during childhood having a 1.9-fold greater risk of COPD than women who had not been exposed.
She added: "Passive smoke is a Group 1 cancer-causing carcinogen and as 14% of Irish children are exposed to these carcinogens and other toxic substances in cars, our legislators must protect them."
With at least 38,000 non-smokers dying each year in the US as a result of secondhand smoke, smoke-free policies are clearly the most effective approach to prevent harm from passive smoke.
The levels of tar and nicotine in passive smoke are so small that it has been calculated that it would take three trillion years to have the effect of smoking in a non-smoker.
"This will help ensure workers are exposed to as little passive smoke as possible." The legislation gives clear advice to help workers who may be exposed to second hand smoke in people's homes, which will not fall under Scotland's public smoking ban.
One doctor wrote, 'A 29-year-old woman has been exposed to high levels of passive smoke inhalation during the course of her occupation as a restaurant manager.
A study of children exposed to passive smoking, conducted at the University of Medicine of New Jersey in New Brunswick, New Jersey, indicated that high levels of free radicals in tobacco smoke are believed to be responsible for decreased levels of vitamin C in smokers and children who are subjected to passive smoke in their homes.