path integral


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path integral

[′path ‚int·ə·grəl]
(quantum mechanics)
An integral of a functional over function space; central to a formulation of quantum mechanics developed by R. Feynman.
References in periodicals archive ?
We generalized the Feynman path integral to expand the theory of superfluids, describes lead author Ilias Seifie the conceptual advance.
But read my book and you can talk as if you're smart, even if you don't quite get that path integral thingy.
here the first measure of the path integral is over the two modes of the graviton labelled p = 1,2 and the second measure is over the matter fields.
This approach is extended by the path integral method [14, 15] and the multiple phase-screen method [11, 16, 17].
In the next section, we present a path integral formulation of ab initio molecular dynamics which allows a quantum formulation of both the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom.
The proposed method addresses computational efficiency and modelling shortcomings also through the use of path integral approach for transforming stress resultant and stiffness coefficients (i.e.
Andales' entry was about Feynman's path integral formulation of quantum physics.
Applying the rule worked out by Richard Feynman in the unified quantum theory, the so-called path integral, this means that the resulting quantum values can then be mapped on to the classical dynamics.
The vector path integral sums up the projection of the field vector on the vectorial path element.
The essential ingredient, he says, is how Feynman rules are derived from first principles, and he uses the path integral approach to teach it.
You won't see any applications of the laws of thermodynamics, Schrodinger equation(s), or Richard Feynman's path integral formulation of quantum field theory.
In computation, since the atmospheric structure constant is variable with height on slant propagation path, the computing formulas have to reserve [C.sup.2.sub.n](h) path integral calculus form; H is the height between transmitter and receiver.