pathogen


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pathogen

, pathogene
any agent that can cause disease

Pathogen

Any agent capable of causing disease. The term pathogen is usually restricted to living agents, which include viruses, rickettsia, bacteria, fungi, yeasts, protozoa, helminths, and certain insect larval stages. See Disease

Pathogenicity is the ability of an organism to enter a host and cause disease. The degree of pathogenicity, that is, the comparative ability to cause disease, is known as virulence. The terms pathogenic and nonpathogenic refer to the relative virulence of the organism or its ability to cause disease under certain conditions. This ability depends not only upon the properties of the organism but also upon the ability of the host to defend itself (its immunity) and prevent injury. The concept of pathogenicity and virulence has no meaning without reference to a specific host. For example, gonococcus is capable of causing gonorrhea in humans but not in lower animals. See Medical mycology, Medical parasitology, Plant pathology, Plant viruses and viroids, Virulence

pathogen

[′path·ə·jən]
(medicine)
A disease-producing agent; usually refers to living organisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Industrialized nations' new taste for exotic food has also been linked with various zoonotic pathogens or parasites, such as protozoa (Toxoplasma), trematodes (Fasciola sp.
Underground-drip irrigation minimizes contamination risks because the water, which may carry pathogens, isn't applied directly to the edible portions of most plants that will be eaten raw.
Fetal exposure to oral pathogens was considered to have occurred if umbilical cord serum at delivery demonstrated an immunoglobulin M-positive (IgM-positive) response to at least one of five oral pathogens, she explained.
In cases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, treatment eradicated the pathogen in 223 of 232 cases, (96.
But what makes the food biotechnology debate so intriguing is that, unlike the issue of foodborne pathogens in meat, it's hardly a black and white story of a greedy industry threatening public safety.
These pathogens include, but are not limited to, hepatitis B virus and HIV.
Despite this understanding of plant-pathogen interactions, surprisingly little is known about how major resistance genes evolved, and how they interact with pathogen genes in a gene-for-gene system.
Unlike the antibodies that mothers pass along to their infants through breast milk, oligosaccharides can protect the baby from pathogens to which the mother has never been exposed.
Microbial pathogens and toxics can be present in CSOs at levels that pose risks to human health.
We look forward to the approval of the Intercept Platelet System and working with Baxter to launch the first system to inactivate pathogens in platelets.
Not every method is good for every kind of pathogen, Reagan says.
As the person responsible for the safety of everyone in your camp, you need to know that your responsibility extends to bloodborne pathogen contagion risks, risks due to HIV (the causative virus of AIDS) and HBV (the causative virus of Hepatitis B).