pathogen


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Wikipedia.

pathogen

, pathogene
any agent that can cause disease

Pathogen

Any agent capable of causing disease. The term pathogen is usually restricted to living agents, which include viruses, rickettsia, bacteria, fungi, yeasts, protozoa, helminths, and certain insect larval stages. See Disease

Pathogenicity is the ability of an organism to enter a host and cause disease. The degree of pathogenicity, that is, the comparative ability to cause disease, is known as virulence. The terms pathogenic and nonpathogenic refer to the relative virulence of the organism or its ability to cause disease under certain conditions. This ability depends not only upon the properties of the organism but also upon the ability of the host to defend itself (its immunity) and prevent injury. The concept of pathogenicity and virulence has no meaning without reference to a specific host. For example, gonococcus is capable of causing gonorrhea in humans but not in lower animals. See Medical mycology, Medical parasitology, Plant pathology, Plant viruses and viroids, Virulence

pathogen

[′path·ə·jən]
(medicine)
A disease-producing agent; usually refers to living organisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other applications of NGS include pathogen surveillance (such as in animal populations, water supplies, or food processing) and can discover previously unrecognized or never-before seen pathogens.
As pre- inoculation by mycorrhizae has been found necessary for pathogen protection in agricultural systems (e.
Human activities may also be a source of wildlife infection, which could create new reservoirs of human pathogens.
For example, before applying manure to the fields, farmers must compost or treat it to remove pathogens.
Miami Beach -- Unexplained vaginal bleeding and fetal exposure to oral pathogens have been linked individually with spontaneous preterm birth, and new data suggest the presence of both is associated with greater risk than either alone.
For example, a treatment was classified as a failure if any sign of residual infection remained in a patient who did not undergo follow-up testing to determine whether the residual bacteria represented the original pathogen or a new organism.
Nestle tries to justify yoking the two issues by claiming that the debate over GM foods, like that over foodborne pathogens, is at the root of a debate over food safety.
The concept requires workers to treat all blood and various other bodily fluids as if infected with HIV, hepatitis B virus, and other bloodborne pathogens.
Concentrations and types of pathogens in sludges depend on two principal factors: the incidence of infection with a community and the type of sludge treatment.
While most rust strains are successfully repulsed by the crop's resistance genes, the resistance genes in turn challenge the pathogen to generate new strains that can overcome them.
Modeling the growth, survival and death of microbial pathogens in foods
For a pathogen to infect a person via the digestive tract, it first has to latch on to the sugars that line the gut wall.