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patient

a person who is receiving medical care
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The emerging concept of rewarding hospitals for meeting performance measures that are based upon patient satisfaction surveys and quality performance, rather than on the volume of services provided, has resulted in the identification of high-performing and low-performing providers and concomitant reductions in reimbursement rates for low-performing hospitals (CMS, 2010b; Vina et al.
Connecting patient satisfaction to reimbursement represents a complete upheaval of the way in which providers are paid for patient care; as a country, we've begun to transfer our focus from the quantity of diagnostic and treatment interventions ("fee for service" reimbursement) to the quality that results from that care.
The lack of connection between painkillers and patient satisfaction is frankly the opposite of what we expected to find," said lead study author Tayler Schwartz of Alpert Medical School at Brown University in Providence, R.
In 2006, the hospital received Press Ganey's Summit Award for earning consistently high patient satisfaction scores.
A total of 37 hospitals participated in the patient satisfaction survey 2010, including facilities in remote Al Gharbia (Western Region) areas like Delma Island.
The patient satisfaction program originally was founded on a number of interrelated principles:
We have experienced high patient satisfaction and long-lasting results with Radiesse injections for minor nasal defects, especially those that involve the bony dorsum or radix.
Press Ganey Associates, an Indiana-based firm that manages and measures patient satisfaction for hospitals and medical practices, has come up with observations on how busy doctors can assuage the feelings of patients who have had to wait.
Northumbria Healthcare achieved a mortality index of 95 - eighth in the region - a patient satisfaction rating of 77pc and a 13pc score on long-patient waits.
Variables other than pain discordance and perceived education--including narcotic use, seeing the same provider, years of physician training, and change in pain-scale raring at the time of the patient interview--did not correlate with patient satisfaction.
Through its revised "quality score card," its HMO plan will reward physician groups for improving the quality of care given to the HMO plan's 2 million members, based on health outcomes and patient satisfaction information.

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