patrilocal

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patrilocal

residence of a married couple with husband's kin. Often this specifically means with the husband's father, but not always, so the synonym virilocal is often used to distance it from PATRILINEAL DESCENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patrilocality and the enabling behavior of family members, whether acquiescence or participation in abuse, calls for education in the community and in the courts.
This, said the archaeologists is a strong indication of patrilocality - a male-centred kinship system where females move to reside in the location of the males when they marry.
This also provides a strong indication of Patrilocality, a male-centered kinship system where females move to reside in the location of the males when they marry.
However, a more detailed study with uniparental markers is needed to allow for a more in depth evaluation of the impact that matrilocality/ patrilocality oriented practices, asymmetry of gene flow, and inbreeding have had on the biological structure of the ethnic groups in the Vaupes region.
(8.) See, for example, Melvin Firestone, Brothers and Rivals: Patrilocality in Savage Cove (St.
Belonging is important in Newfoundland and Labrador but with its long history of patrilocality, where and to whom have women belonged?
However, continued social-cultural barriers to population flow such as endogamy and patrilocality could have led to the observed current differential geographic frequencies between the J2a-M410 and J1-M267 haplogroups.
58-68; John Bryant, 'Patrilines, patrilocality and fertility decline in Viet Nam', Asia-Pacific Population Journal, 17, 2 (2002): 111-28.
Even where gender equality is constitutionally endorsed, sex-based differences in role allocation may be reflected in male-female wage gaps, patrilineage (where descent, and often resources, flow through males), patrilocality (requiring women to move near their husband's kin groups upon marriage), and traditional attitudes of society forbidding women to carry out certain activities (Coltrane, 1992; Emrich et al., 2004; Kantor, 2002; Welter et al., 2003).
The combined practices of marrying outside the language group, a phenomenon known as linguistic exogamy, and patrilocality, whereby a woman moves to the village of her husband, result in communities composed of a core of men and children who are same-language speakers and differently-speaking in-marrying women.
As noted in the introduction, rules and practices of exogamous marriage, land tenure, patrilineal/matrilineal inheritance, access rights and patrilocality, as well as the periodic dispersal and congregation of local groups at King George Sound present many significant parallels to the Stanner model of Aboriginal hunter-gatherer cultural ecology.