patrilocal

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patrilocal

residence of a married couple with husband's kin. Often this specifically means with the husband's father, but not always, so the synonym virilocal is often used to distance it from PATRILINEAL DESCENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, this new evidence from the skeletons is consistent with other archaeological, genetic, anthropological and even linguistic evidence for Patrilocality in Neolithic Europe.
But, on an island with a long history of patrilocality and a strong patrilineal ideology, where and to whom have women belonged?
Firestone, Melvin, 1967, Brothers and Rivals: Patrilocality in Savage Cove.
Our evidence for the violent abduction of young females from Group 1 rather dramatically supports Eisenhauer's (2003) case for patrilocality at Talheim, and also bolsters the isotopic (Bentley et al.
We will recall that many of the women of the Hula villages, as in other parts of Melanesia are, by virtue of patrilocality, foreigners.
Previously tested cross-cultural explanations for restricting women in a society in either politics, general social situations or religion have included: sex of God, sex of significant ancestors, men's fear of sex, monotheism, animal husbandry, male focused inheritance patterns, agriculture, patrilocality and patrilineality, political complexity, and the presence of classic religion.
2002; Price & Bentley 2005), and the development of a model suggesting patrilocality (Price & Bentley 2005; Bentley 2006; also considered by Eisenhauer 2003).
Patrilineality and patrilocality are more important among the western Enga, whereas multilocality (i.
If true, the contrast with skeletal-isotopic evidence for patrilocality in Neolithic Europe (Bentley et al.
However, even if these particular non-local females were from other Neolithic farming communities, this evidence for patrilocality suggests that upon first contact the brides may have been foragers, an occurrence that has often been observed ethnographically (Spielmann and Eder 1994
It is then a model that is the opposite of patrilocality that is closely bound up with the emergence of small nuclear families where the males competed for the resources of the paternal line of descent.
For example, at the Shijia site in central Shaanxi, where patrilocality and return burial or re-burial may have been practised (Gao & Lee 1993).