patron

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patron

[Lat.,=like a father], one who lends influential support to some person, cause, art or institution. Patronage existed in various ancient cultures but was primarily a Roman institution. In Roman law the lord was patronus (protector or defender) in relation to his freedmen and to others, known as his clients, whom he represented in the senate and before tribunals. Under the Roman Empire the term was applied to persons like MaecenasMaecenas
(Caius Maecenas) , d. 8 B.C., Roman statesman and patron of letters. He was born (between 74 B.C. and 64 B.C.) into a wealthy family and was a trusted adviser of Octavian (Augustus), who employed Maecenas as his personal representative for various political missions.
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 who supported artists and writers. Perhaps the most munificent patronage occurred in Italy during the RenaissanceRenaissance
[Fr.,=rebirth], term used to describe the development of Western civilization that marked the transition from medieval to modern times. This article is concerned mainly with general developments and their impact in the fields of science, rhetoric, literature, and
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 under patrons such as the MediciMedici
, Italian family that directed the destinies of Florence from the 15th cent. until 1737. Of obscure origin, they rose to immense wealth as merchants and bankers, became affiliated through marriage with the major houses of Europe, and, besides acquiring (1569) the title
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, the SforzaSforza
, Italian family that ruled the duchy of Milan from 1450 to 1535. Rising from peasant origins, the Sforzas became condottieri and used this military position to become rulers in Milan. The family governed by force, ruse, and power politics.
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, and many popes. Francis IFrancis I,
1494–1547, king of France (1515–47), known as Francis of Angoulême before he succeeded his cousin and father-in-law, King Louis XII. Wars with the Holy Roman Emperor
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 of France and his sister Margaret of NavarreMargaret of Navarre
or Margaret of Angoulême
, 1492–1549, queen consort of Navarre; sister of King Francis I of France. After the death of her first husband she married (1527) Henri d'Albret, king of Navarre; their daughter was Jeanne d'Albret.
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 were distinguished patrons of art and letters; a famous English patron was Lord ChesterfieldChesterfield, Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th earl of,
1694–1773, English statesman and author. A noted wit and orator, his long public career, begun in 1715, included an ambassadorship to The Hague (1728–32), a
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. Since ancient times Christians have honored patron saints as tutelary guardians of persons, institutions, places, and crafts. Historically, artists have depended on institutional (e.g., government and church) as well as individual patronage; Picasso's Guernica and Chagall's stained glass windows are examples of commissioned works. Universities and private foundations have also become important sources of patronage for artists.

patron

1. a customer of a shop, hotel, etc., esp a regular one
2. See patron saint
3. (in ancient Rome) the protector of a dependant or client, often the former master of a freedman still retaining certain rights over him
4. Christianity a person or body having the right to present a clergyman to a benefice
References in periodicals archive ?
David Mamet's two-person play Oleana is set, claustrophobically, entirely within a faculty office, in which the accusations of a female student destroy the career of a professor who had patronizingly tried to help her from academic failure.
There's probably a law that defines the rate at which the actual performance of a government agency gets worse as its patronizingly genial mission statements proliferate: Such is certainly the case at Washington's J.
In particular, the patronizingly didactic Adrian has a definitive link with the General, as their actions and thoughts seemingly intertwine.
It deceives few teachers, who will soon, if they don't already, recognize it as a rhetorical maneuver, paternalistically and patronizingly intended to offset the psychologically damaging language of accountability while simultaneously seducing them to more enthusiastically embrace their continuing subjugation.
In the scripted scene, there is a bit of witty interplay between Elizabeth and Darcy, but then he is chagrined to realize, after he has patronizingly explained the procedure, that Elizabeth can hit the bull's eye better than he.
In other words: It's only the terminally Savvy who patronizingly assume Americans can't see any farther than their gas gauge.
The book was written in the patronizingly British tone of cultural superiority over the uneducated, "dirty yum-yum girls" of Hong Kong's red-light district.
"The federal government for many years has really treated the First Nations pretty patronizingly with collecting their data on where their properties are, where the lots are on the reserves," he said.
And his put-on pessimism was a pale echo of the Romney gilding and Obama gutting done by the president's allies, who have been unusually generous with reminiscences of the way Obama patronizingly told Hillary Clinton she was "likable enough" during a debate four years ago.
If the cost of health and welfare it causes was obviated, then there would be no deficit." I did not - as he disingenuously implies - object to looking after those who are suffering from the recession, the so-called 'underclass' that he patronizingly claims needs education and nurturing.
Jacques Derrida and Jurgen Habermas in 2003 even proposed that anti-Americanism be the foundation of the beginning of a genuine European foreign policy (patronizingly chastising East Europeans for being so churlish as to support the United States).
Upon meeting her a decade later, Lincoln is supposed to exclaimed, "So you're the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war!" (20) Goldfield's exegesis of Stowe's--for some reason, he patronizingly and repeatedly refers to her as "Harriet"--book makes plain how she steeped it in religious sentiment, thus helping it to resonate with millions of her countrymen in the North.