pavilion


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pavilion

1. a summerhouse or other decorative shelter
2. a building or temporary structure, esp one that is open and ornamental, for housing exhibitions
3. a large ornate tent, esp one with a peaked top, as used by medieval armies
4. one of a set of buildings that together form a hospital or other large institution

Pavilion

An open structure or small ornamental building, shelter or kiosk used as a summer house or as an adjunct of a larger building. It is usually a detached structure for specialized activities, and is often located as a terminal structure with a hipped roof on all sides so as to have a pyramidal form.

Pavilion

 

(1) A small or light and open structure that stands alone and has a special relation to the outdoors. Many temple and palace buildings in the Orient are pavilions. The pavilion became an integral part of European palace and park architecture during the 17th and 18th centuries in France and Britain and in the 18th and first quarter of the 19th century in Russia.

(2) A portion of a large building, usually topped by a separate roof.

(3) A permanent or temporary structure, intended for exhibits, trade, the filming of motion pictures, and so forth.

pavilion

[pə′vil·yən]
(lapidary)
The portion of a faceted gemstone below the girdle. Also known as base.

pavilion

1. A detached or semidetached structure used for entertainment or (as at a hospital) for specialized activities.
2. On a façade, a prominent portion usually central or terminal, identified by projection, height, and special roof forms.
3. In a garden or fairground, a temporary structure or tent, usually ornamented.
References in classic literature ?
The Caliph Haroun-al-Raschid, chancing at that moment to open a window in the saloon of his palace looking on the garden, was surprised to see the pavilion brilliantly illuminated.
Tell him also what you have just told me -- that Mazarin has placed me in the pavilion of the orangery in order to make me a visit, and assure him that I shall take advantage of this honor he proposes to accord to me to obtain from him some amelioration of our captivity.
That's how I managed to enter his house in Paris - it was called the Pavilion - twice.
They all sat down in the little pavilion to watch an autumn sunset of deep red fire and pallid gold.
Once, on the dancing-floor, he saw Lizzie Connolly go by in the arms of a young workingman; and, later, when he made the round of the pavilion, he came upon her sitting by a refreshment table.
The entertainment being now ended, all left the pavilion and formed their gay procession back to the Emerald City again.
There, in front of their respective pavilions, flew the martlets of Audley, the roses of Loring, the scarlet bars of Wake, the lion of the Percies and the silver wings of the Beauchamps, each supported by a squire clad in hanging green stuff to represent so many Tritons, and bearing a huge conch-shell in their left hands.
Then the great hush fell on the crowd once more, and all eyes looked toward one particular point of the ground, occupied by a little wooden pavilion, with the blinds down over the open windows, and the door closed.
Laboratory and Yellow Room are in a pavilion at the end of the park, about three hundred metres (a thousand feet) from the chateau.
She looked at the little white bed, which had been hers a few days before, and thought she would like to sleep in it that night, and wake, as formerly, with her mother smiling over her in the morning: Then she thought with terror of the great funereal damask pavilion in the vast and dingy state bedroom, which was awaiting her at the grand hotel in Cavendish Square.
Linon, said something to her, and went towards the pavilion where the ladies took off their skates.
They strolled about among the booths where peanuts were grinding and popcorn was roasting in preparation for the day, and went on and inspected the dance floor of the pavilion.