payload


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payload

1. that part of a cargo earning revenue
2. 
a. the passengers, cargo, or bombs carried by an aircraft
b. the equipment carried by a rocket, satellite, or spacecraft

payload

(pay -lohd)
1. The total mass of a satellite, spacecraft, etc., that is carried into orbit by a launch vehicle. It is that part of the total launcher mass that is not necessary for the operation of the launcher. It is usually a small or very small fraction of the total launcher mass.
2. The mass of the experimental and operational equipment of a satellite, planetary probe, etc.

Payload

 

in space science and rocket technology, a space vehicle (artificial satellite or spaceship) or ballistic missile warhead carrying out a specific mission after separation from the final stage of the rocket carrier. The weight of payloads that can be launched by rockets varies from a few kilograms to several dozen metric tons.

payload

[′pā‚lōd]
(aerospace engineering)
That which an aircraft, rocket, or the like carries over and above what is necessary for the operation of the vehicle in its flight.
(mining engineering)
The weight of coal, ore, or mineral handled, as distinct from dirt, stone, or gangue.

payload

payload
That part of the useful load of an aircraft that is over and above the load necessary for the operation of the vehicle. It includes the commercial load of a civil aircraft and armament carried on board a military aircraft. The proportion of fuel to the payload depends on the range required, but the payload is limited by the space available and the aircraft maximum structural weight. See payload/range graph.

payload

(1) The "actual data" in a packet or file minus all headers attached for transport and minus all descriptive meta-data. In a network packet, headers are appended to the payload for transport and then discarded at their destination. In a key-length-value structure, the key and length are descriptive data about the value (the payload). See protocol stack.

(2) In the analysis of malicious software such as worms, viruses and Trojans, it refers to the software's harmful results. Examples of payloads include data destruction, messages with insulting text or spurious email messages sent to a large number of people.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 Use of UAVs in civilian airspace to boost the growth of UAV Payload demand
ABB's new IRB 4450S model for medium-size injection presses handles payloads up to 66 lb and can reach more than 7 ft down or more than 3 ft below its base.
To learn more about eRelease Payload please visit www.
Due to budget restraints, government agencies around the world are increasingly open to adopting the hosted payload concept.
satellites & probes / on-board data management / on board data management / payload data handling units
The report contains 162 tables, charts and graphs that add visual analysis in order to explain developing trends within the UAV payload and subsystems market.
Astroliner would climb to about 400,000 feet - higher than the X-15 rocket planes flew in the 1960s - then release its own payload of 3,500-pound satellites.
With a 50-50 success rate and a $60 million payload [at risk], none of us feel that's something we want to do.
HOUSTON -- SPACEHAB, Incorporated (NASDAQ:SPAB), a leading provider of commercial space services, announced today that its Astrotech Space Operations (ASO) subsidiary is responding to a NASA Request for Proposal (RFP) soliciting payload processing capabilities for expendable launch vehicles from the Western Range in California.
Unlike full-time astronauts, the new breed -- called payload specialist -- was conceived specifically to handle the details of astronomy, biology and other scientific missions, which the agency envisioned as a major thrust of the shuttle era.